Web 2.0 / Web 3.0

Session Abstract/Description: 

Marijel Melo, University of Arizona

“‘Hacking’ the Writing Class: Engaging Web 2.0 Interfaces to Cultivate Contextualized Learning”

Inspired by the conversations resonating from Hacking the Academy and from the Computers and Writing 2015 theme for the exploration of 21st century technoliteracies, I will discuss the affordances of engaging web 2.0 interfaces (specifically the popular interface, Instagram) to create digital sites of praxis within the classroom to cultivate contextualized, situated, and playful learning. This presentation explores the theme of technology and education with a specific focus on hacking the traditional classroom space (often fraught with time and space constraints) into a space to promote student innovation and collaboration.

 

John Gallagher, University of Illinois

“Audience as Network: A Web 2.0 Circulating Discourse”

 

This paper presents a short history of the term “audience” to offer “network” as a possible alternative to audience in the context of Web 2.0. Using actor-network theory, it argues that network is especially helpful for understanding the agency that non-writers have in the circulation of discourse in Web 2.0. Network captures the non-linear and unrelated making and remaking of readers’ expectations, which in turns highlights the shifting nature of generic conventions and expectations. The outcome of this interpretation is that new genres can occur that challenge corporate and hegemonic discourse.

 

Brandon Hopkins, University of Central Florida

“Citation in Web 3.0: The In-Essay Hypertext Bibliography”

 

This multimedia presentation explores how the theoretical value of ethos as an Aristotelian appeal can inform choices and practical value assigned to reference and works cited pages in twenty-first-century composition instruction. Attendees are invited to consider a hyperlink citation style in an increasingly-digital composition classroom.

 

Laura Anne Carroll-Adler, University of South California

“Race, Writing, and Web2: Introducing Students to Online Discussion”


When NPR reporter Michele Norris came to campus to discuss her Race Card Project website, she provided an opportunity to examine topics of the course theme, Race and Social Justice, combined with issues of digital literacy and the rhetoric of public engagement.  Students were tasked with evaluating the rhetorical task assigned on the website, which takes its cue from the pun on “Race Card” and displays 6-word comments on graphic “cards.”  In analyzing the rhetoric of the discussions that followed, students examined how the presentation of the material, including the ethos bestowed by Norris, affected the discussions that followed.

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Presenters for this session

Brandon Hopkins's picture
University of Central Florida
John Gallagher's picture
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
LauraAnne Carroll-Adler's picture
University of Southern California
Presentation Title Abstract Categories Tags Presenter(s)
Audience as Network: A Web 2.0 Circulating Discourse

This paper presents a short history of the term “audience” to offer “network” as a possible alternative to audience in the context of Web 2.0. Using actor-network theory, it argues that network is especially helpful for understanding the agency that non-writers have in the circulation of discourse in Web 2.0. Network captures the non-linear and unrelated making and remaking of readers’ expectations, which in turns highlights the shifting nature of generic conventions and expectations. The outcome of this interpretation is that new genres can occur that challenge corporte and hegemonic discourse.

Inventions, Social Media, Technologies, Writing Studies Audience, Actor-Network Theory, social networks, online discourses John Gallagher
Citation in Web 3.0: The In-Essay Hypertext Bibliography

This multimedia presentation explores how the theoretical value of ethos as an Aristotelian appeal can inform choices and practical value assigned to reference and works cited pages in twenty-first-century composition instruction. Attendees are invited to consider a hyperlink citation style in an increasingly-digital composition classroom.

Access, Interventions, Inventions, Technologies, Usability / User Experience access, interventions, Inventions, technologies, Usability / User Experience Brandon Hopkins
Race, Writing, and Web 2: Introducing Students to Online Discussion

When NPR reporter Michele Norris came to campus to discuss her Race Card Project website, she provided an opportunity to examine topics of the course theme, Race and Social Justice, combined with issues of digital literacy and the rhetoric of public engagement.  Students were tasked with evaluating the rhetorical task assigned on the website, which takes its cue from the pun on “Race Card” and displays 6-word comments on graphic “cards.”  In analyzing the rhetoric of the discussions that followed, students examined how the presentation of the material, including the ethos bestowed by Norris, affected the discussions that followed. 

Literacies, Pedagogies, Social Media, Writing Studies First Year Composition, engagement, online discourses LauraAnne Carroll-Adler