H2

Session Abstract/Description: 

Mary Tripp, University of Central Florida

“Exploring and Enacting Shifting Literacies through Artifacts”

Literacy practices change with the circulation of new technologies. These technologies produce physical objects (artifacts) which represent the literacy practices of the time. By examining these artifacts we begin to understand not only THAT literacy changes but HOW literacy changes as various technologies circulate through a culture. This presentation highlights an interdisciplinary collaboration between students, faculty, and library archivists to explore the shifts in literacy through both the production of physical and digital curated exhibits of literacy artifacts. The activity of curation creates new knowledge about literacy practices and enacts theories of new literacy studies.

 

Jason Tham, University of Minnesota

“Negotiating Networked Learning in the Era of Literacies”

 

As the proliferation of digital technologies and access to information continues to invite different ways of thinking, literacies in the 21st century is influenced by the constantly evolving, densely interconnected complex systems. This presentation explores how connectivism and networked learning might be used to enhance teaching and learning experiences in the writing classroom. I seek to demonstrate how personal communication devices, Open Educational Resources, and cloud-based computing could be integrated into the curriculum to cultivate interactive and self-directed learning, enabling students to acquire knowledge, collaborate with other writers, and establish their professional identities. 

 

Chris Friend, Saint Leo University

“The Missing Link: Interventions for Enhancing Traditional Student Composition”

 

Typical composition courses have students create documents that are inherently print-centric, designed for the page regardless of whether that physical form is necessary or appropriate. Writing for electronic environments uses the hyperlink as an essential rhetorical element of communication, and traditional documents can easily be enhanced with hyperlinks using available, familiar tools. This presentation advocates for the incorporation of hyperlinks into composition assignments and instruction.

 

Janine Butler, East Carolina University

“Digital /Visual Literacies and Multimodal Strategies in the Writing Classroom”

 

This presenter, a Deaf PhD student who communicates through American Sign Language, discusses how her cultural and scholarly identity shapes her teaching approach in her first-year writing courses. She consciously integrates visual projections, online communication, and other multimodal interventions. In particular, this presentation will follow her discoveries teaching a first-year writing section with one hard-of-hearing student; specifically, the digital and multimodal strategies she used to communicate with all her students. The presenter’s inclusive pedagogy could serve as an example for writing instructors who would like to design access to digital, visual, and written literacies for students with various learning styles.

 

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Presenters for this session

Jason Tham's picture
University of Minnesota–Twin Cities
Janine Butler's picture
East Carolina University
Mary Tripp's picture
University of Central Florida
Chris Friend's picture
Saint Leo University
Presentation Title Abstract Categories Tags Presenter(s)
Negotiating Networked Learning in the Era of Literacies

As the proliferation of digital technologies and access to information continues to invite different ways of thinking, literacies in the 21st century is influenced by the constantly evolving, densely interconnected complex systems. This presentation explores how connectivism and networked learning might be used to enhance teaching and learning experiences in the writing classroom. I seek to demonstrate how personal communication devices, Open Educational Resources, and cloud-based computing could be integrated into the curriculum to cultivate interactive and self-directed learning, enabling students to acquire knowledge, collaborate with other writers, and establish their professional identities. 

Access, Inventions, Literacies, Pedagogies, Technologies Networks, Instruction Jason Tham
The Missing Link: Interventions for Enhancing Traditional Student Composition

Typical composition courses have students create documents that are inherently print-centric, designed for the page regardless of whether that physical form is necessary or appropriate. Writing for electronic environments uses the hyperlink as an essential rhetorical element of communication, and traditional documents can easily be enhanced with hyperlinks using available, familiar tools. This presentation advocates for the incorporation of hyperlinks into composition assignments and instruction.

Interventions, Pedagogies, Writing Studies Chris Friend
Digital/Visual Literacies and Multimodal Strategies in the Writing Classroom

This presenter, a Deaf PhD student who communicates through American Sign Language, discusses how her cultural and scholarly identity shapes her teaching approach in her first-year writing courses. She consciously integrates visual projections, online communication, and other multimodal interventions. In particular, this presentation will follow her discoveries teaching a first-year writing section with one hard-of-hearing student; specifically, the digital and multimodal strategies she used to communicate with all her students. The presenter’s inclusive pedagogy could serve as an example for writing instructors who would like to design access to digital, visual, and written literacies for students with various learning styles.

Access, Literacies, Pedagogies Janine Butler