Panel Title: Necessity is the Mother of Intervention: Shifting Scenes, Recent Developments, and the Delivery of Old News

Proposal Title: 
Panel Title: Necessity is the Mother of Intervention: Shifting Scenes, Recent Developments, and the Delivery of Old News
Abstract: 

In this session, the presenters tell the story of the genesis, development, and institutional itinerary of a pedagogical idea: specifically, an innovative curricular scaffolding that values and enables a pedagogy of projection and reflection. This is the story of

    •    of emerging technologies that posed the need for another sort of pedagogical intervention,
    •    of an emerging institutional predicament that occasioned the need for a pedagogical intervention, and
    •    of how the intervention now has made the very technological inventions from which it was born nonessential.

The characters in this story include outgoing WPA, incoming WPA, graduate assistant to the WPA, and colleague/respondent. This assemblage of characters will speak to the various moments and positionalities of pedagogical invention and intervention in first-year writing at the presenters' University.

Proposal: 

In this session, we tell the story of the genesis, development, and institutional itinerary of a pedagogical idea: specifically, an innovative curricular scaffolding that values and enables a pedagogy of projection and reflection. This is the story of

    •    of emerging technologies that posed the need for another sort of pedagogical intervention,
    •    of an emerging institutional predicament that occasioned the need for a pedagogical intervention, and
    •    of how the intervention now has made the very technological inventions from which it was born nonessential.

The characters in this story include outgoing WPA, incoming WPA, graduate assistant to the WPA, and colleague/respondent. This assemblage of characters will speak to the various moments and positionalities of pedagogical invention and intervention in first-year writing at The Presenters' University.
 
Presenter #1: I am a Writing Teacher, I Teach Writers: How Audio-Visual Writing Pedagogy Isn't
 
Audio-Visual Writing projects are (most) often pursued by crews of audio-visual writers. Collaborative audio-visual assignments in writing classes may find groups of three to five students working on a single production. In such a group, one student may edit, but never touch a camera. Another student may conduct and videotape interviews, but never edit any video. Another student may scout locations and collect archival media assets, but never perform any of the duties writing teachers may recognize as "writing" activities. Teachers who assign such projects are faced with the onerous problem of assessing each student fairly across such disparate yet necessary duties. This presentation tells the story of how Presenter #1 came to develop a pedagogical intervention for meeting the needs presented by teaching with Audio-Visual Writing technologies.  Presenter #1 will then tell the story of what this Audio-Visual Writing intervention does for (and to) the selection, enactment,  and assessment of more traditional writing assignments.  
 
Presenter #2: From Pedagogy to Program: Exigency, Opportunity, and Invention

In this presentation, Presenter #2 will consider programmatic implications of a way of teaching writing that operationalizes rhetorical learning through low-stakes, collaborative inquiry. The First-Year Writing Program at Our University currently has a set of shared learning goals and an inquiry-based curriculum that puts systematic inquiries into experience, culture, and community into the service of students’ developing academic literacies. As Director of the First-Year Writing Program, Presenter #2's ongoing project is to make visible the pedagogical moves implicit in the common curriculum, and to support teachers (especially new teachers and those not from teaching disciplines) in the work of enabling learning (in contrast to “teaching”) for their students. Currently, Presenter #2 is looking to the pedagogical approach originally developed by Presenter #1 for teaching Audio-Visual Writing as a means to facilitate the inquiry moves of our First-Year Writing curriculum and to help teachers understand how to teach rhetorically. Accordingly, Presenter #2 will discuss the opportunities and challenges associated with extending a curriculum programmatically.
 
Presenter #3: But I'm Just the Grad Assistant...: Using Multimodal Activities to Navigate Issues of Positionality and Power for Pedagogical Intervention
 
As the WPA graduate assistant, Presenter #3 will articulate the negotiation of positionality and power in moments of pedagogical intervention amongst fellow graduate student TAs. Shipka’s (2011) definition of writing as always a multimodal communicative act and her tactics to develop “metacommunicative awareness” through multimodal composing are applicable beyond that of students. In this presentation, Presenter #3 will describe how Shipka’s multimodality becomes a tool for facilitating reflective teaching practices. Specifically, Presenter #3 will illustrate how engaging in multimodal activities within TA mentor groups serve as a heuristic for critical reflection on teaching practices. The heuristic allows for a meta-awareness of how assignments correlate to pedagogical practices and teacherly ethos, opening up space for pedagogical revision. This presentation then will articulate the affordances and challenges of facilitating multimodal activities (akin to Shipka’s examples) in FYW teaching mentor groups to reflect on their teaching pedagogies. It is hoped that these described scenes of intervention will provide considerations for how to navigate pedagogical interventions from the position of a WPA graduate student assistant.
 
Respondent/Colleague: Praxicalities
From the vantage of an off-campus colleague conversant with the multiple modalities of first-year writing administration, teaching, and teacher preparation, the respondent will frame discussion by critically reflecting on the praxical interventions into college writing instruction these panelists provide, both individually and together.

Context: 
This panel explores one instance of a pedagogy for teaching audio-visual writing has helped provide a much-needed intervention for the repopulation of the basic writing course at the presenters' institution. This panel extends the pedagogical conversation by reverse engineering the traditional writing curriculum and assessment scheme by co-opting the fundamental design of an audio-visual writing curriculum.
Proposal Type: 
panel