2012 Conference Schedule

Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15

Whither the Prosumer?: The Creative Economy and Emerging Forms of Scholarly Communication

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn describes U.S. citizens as Internet “consumers,” separating these consumers from the “creative economy.” She repeatedly uses this binary to distinguish the people who use the Internet from those who create its content. This illustrates a failure to recognize prosumers, those who simultaneously create and access the Internet. The panel will examine prosumption from perspectives ranging from the attention economy to social communities to digital scholarly communication.

Speaker 1: Context-Providers in an Attention Economy
Speaker 2: Folksonomy as Gift: Motivations for Social Tagging
Speaker 3: Working in the Bubble Factory: Prosumer Humanists and Scholarshift
Speaker 4: Prosumers and Algorithmic Truth

Tags: Collaboration, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45

Building Classroom archiTEXTure in Tough Economic Times: Deploying 21st Century Writing

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Roundtable
Tags: Collaboration, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

Structural and Expressive Foundations in Multimedia Authoring

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel maps the “architextual” foundations of multimedia practices in a series of introductory courses entitled IML 140: Workshop in Multimedia Authoring at  the University of Southern California’s Institute for Multimedia Literacy (IML). Housed in the School of Cinematic Arts, the IML approach is premised on the notion that students must be able to not only read and write words, but to use and critique images, sound, typography, design, networks and other media-based tools. As such, this course provides the foundation for the IML’s Minor in Digital Studies, as well as the Honors in Multimedia Scholarship Program. 

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition, Pedagogy

Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00

ArchiTEXTure of Invention in Two Writing Centers: New Media and the Multimodal Invention Process

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

We explore in what ways the invention process of video composition may be different from that of traditional written texts. Pressing questions include:
What ways can we think about invention processes and visual semiotics? How can we encourage students to become inventive through visual conceptualizations?
What is the role of architecture in the invention process of new media products? What meaning does the physical space of interaction have in new media invention?

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition

Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30

Catalysts and Cataclysms: Personal, Institutional, Pedagogical Narratives of the Digital Text

Room: Tompkins 112 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

As panelists, we use personal and scholarly narrative and multi-media performance to explore how the underpinnings of “writing” shift in the production of digital texts. Collectively, we argue for a wider affective and non-discursive (Murray) rhetorical lens for theorizing the production of digital scholarly texts and digital writing assignments.  It is our goal to challenge our audience, as we challenge ourselves and our students, to understand the production of digital texts as a series of generative leaps, rather than as a flow, from text to the screen.

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multiliteracies, Writing Studies

University Architextures: Composing Student and Faculty Identities as Digital Writers and Scholars

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

These three speakers will discuss how the design and implementation of a digital writing space, a programmatic writing requirement, and a long-term research initiative at their medium-sized comprehensive liberal arts institution have contributed to students’ and faculty development as digital writers and scholars.

Speaker 1: Center for Undergraduate Publishing and Information Design
Speaker 2: Online senior portfolios
Speaker 3: The transfer of writing strategies from informal to formal digital writing spaces

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Digital Spaces, Identity

Why Yes, We are Digital Humanists!

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Featured Session

The digital humanities (DH) have received significant attention in the past few years: in academic presses, funding agencies, blogs, and at academic conferences -- including C & W 2011, which included a much-discussed townhall session titled “Are you a Digital Humanist?” Yet, while DH has garnered significant support in traditional liberal arts disciplines, including history and literary studies, the field of computers and writing (C & W) has been slower to respond to this emerging field. This response is puzzling, given the similar interests shared by the two fields in scholarship, pedagogy, and collaborative and interdisciplinary work. This roundtable will discuss ways to encourage broader participation in DH, considering points of resistance or hesitation within C & W that have limited our participation so far. The session will foreground some successful research projects taking place at the intersections of C & W and DH, while also exposing how C & W scholars already working on digital matters might reframe their work to productively expand the meaning and scope of “digital humanities.”

Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarship, Humanities Computing

Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30

ArchiSEXTture: Getting It On in Digital Dating Spaces

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
Tags: Code Studies, Digital Scholarship, Social Media

Recreating bpNichol's "First Screening"

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
Tags: Code Studies, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45

Compose Yourself: Creating Digital Teaching Philosophies

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: CREATE!

In this CREATE! workshop, participants will be coached through the process of composing digital teaching philosophies, either as part of traditional teaching philosophy, or as a new media object.  Some of the questions we will consider in this workshop:

How should we frame new media pedagogy as part of our scholarly agenda?
How can we talk about our new media assignments as more than classroom practice narratives by making them a substantial part of our teacherly identities?
How do new media objects and digital spaces enhance (or complicate) the ways we construct ourselves as teachers?

Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarship, Digital Spaces

Composing in Digital Spaces: Overcoming Barriers and Embracing Opportunities for Scholarship, Professional Writing, and Teaching

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel will focus on the material and immaterial considerations involved in creating new media texts. We focus specifically on three areas of writing research: academic writing, professional writing, and the teaching of writing. Each presentation delineates barriers to successfully composing in digital spaces and suggest ways for overcoming these barriers.

Speaker 1: New Media Publishing Practices: Overcoming Obstacles to Composing Scholarship in Digital Spaces
Speaker 2: Producer, Consumer, or Collaborator?: Reconsidering the Travel Writer’s Role(s) in Writing for Digital Environments
Speaker 3: Why Are We “Thinking like an iPod?”: Critical Considerations for Teaching Writing with Technology

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Digital Spaces, Multimodal Composition

Excavating Feminist Futures

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: ConstrucTEXT

In the move from the printed page to performance, live individuals re-presenting the words of feminist theorists in the context of my original prose, emphasizes the relevance of the body in feminist theory. An accompanying digital piece provides a literal grounding for the spoken words, reinforcing and reinscribing the non-discursive affective elements of feminism, namely the relevance of spirituality to feminist practice.

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Gender, Social Action

The Naming and Locating of Multimodal Texts

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel delves into the meaning behind "multimodal," exploring what the term means to scholars along with the "where" and "how" regarding the composing of multimodal texts. Through interviews, analysis of scholarship, and critical inquiry into the sites of multimodal composing, panelists argue for the most productive ways to classify multimodal texts and what their creation looks like in practice.

Speaker 1: What's in a Name?: The Anatomy of a Definining New/Multi/Modal/Digital/Media Texts
Speaker 2: Viewing Writing as a Medium in College Composition
Speaker 3: Bricks, Bits, and Pixels: Spaces for digital composing

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition

Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15

Constructing Queer Digital Spaces: An Overview, a History, a Future

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Featured Session

In 2002, Jonathan Alexander and Will began soliciting manuscripts for the first queer-focused special issue of Computers & Composition. Despite a smattering of essays addressing queer issues and digital composition, the topic had not been addressed in any substantial way. The resulting issue, *sexualities, technologies, and the teaching of writing,* opened new avenues for scholars, highlighting the complex intersections of sex/sexuality and technologies, from issues of representation in digital environments to to the promises and possibilities for such work in the classroom. Ten years later, our field has exploded with a new generation of young queer scholars who are pushing the boundaries queer scholarship and technology studies.  In this featured session, Jonathan and Will explore this "queer turn" in computers and writing scholarship and use video interviews with emerging researchers to highlight a future for our scholarship.

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Gender, Social Action

The ArchiTEXTure of Praxis: Context, Brain, and Technologies in the Writing Classroom

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Increasingly, writing and new media construction have become “radically distributed” acts. With this in mind, this panel discusses the need for instructors to take a closer look at the “situated cognition” of students in helping them understand knowledge economies, the architecture of the brain and strategy retention, and the affordances of peer-to-peer technologies.

Speaker 1: Using the Economics of Information to Help Students Understand Digital Texts and Digital Information Spaces
Speaker 2: Architexture of the Mind: The Exigency of Cognitive Perspectives in the New Media Classroom
Speaker 3: Inventing knowledge through peer-to-peer technologies:  shared knowledge structures

Tags: Collaboration, Digital Scholarship, Writing Studies

Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30

Beyond Retrofitting: Unlearning Composition in Digital Times

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

The future of rhetoric and composition—and of our own computers and writing— require that we not only learn new skills of composing, but that we also unlearn old epistemologies. This panel identifies processes of unlearning that occur (or in some cases, should occur) in the teaching and manufacturing of digital and multimodal texts.

Speaker 1: Unlearning Accommodation: Universal Design and Multimodal Pedagogies
Speaker 2: Unlearning Publishing: Consolidation and Expertise in the Digital Age
Speaker 3: Unlearning Old Age: What Can Older Adults Teach Us About Digital Literacies?

Tags: Accessibility, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

The “New” Future of Auditory Rhetoric(s): Sound and Silence “Scene” Through Productive Difference

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Featured Session

Since the 2006 special issue in Computers in Composition posed questions on “Sound in/as Composition Space” and the publication of Cynthia Selfe’s (2009) call to action piece, “The Movement of Air, the Breath of Meaning: Aurality and Multimodal Composing,”composition and rhetoric scholars have begun to question our investment in the study of sound. These articles opened up some of the following possibilities: sound as auditory rhetoric, sound as a compositional material, sound as a tool or epistemology, and sound as both a historical and phenomenological reality--a part of all our available means of persuasion. What this featured session seeks to address is the “new” future for the study and teaching of auditory rhetoric. This is both a question of what we have learned as a field and how we might continue to “move forward.” What objects or genres of sound are particularly appropriate to the composition classroom? Does auditory rhetoric occasion the study of all sensory rhetorics separately, or are there ways to integrate these rhetorics? How are “scenic sounds” and spaces rhetorically constructed? How do we negotiate rhetorical responsiveness to sound and silence in the human voice?

Speaker 1: Composing Sound Assignments: Modality, Genre, Difference
Speaker 2: Tuning and Timing for the Rhetoric(s) of Sound
Speaker 3: Hearing to be Scene: Landscaping the Superfield of Audio-Visual Writing
Speaker 4: Sound, Silence, and Rhetorical Responsiveness

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

Theorizing a new term for multi-media engagement: readers, constructors, players

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

In this panel, two undergraduate students and their professor examine what term—rather than, say, reader or writer—might best encapsulate the complex rhetorical work of engaging and constructing computer-based media. Conclusions shared came out of discussions in an upper-level composition course focused on written language in a digital era.

Tags: Digital Scholarship, Pedagogy, Writing Studies

Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop A: 9:00am-12:00pm

Composing and Publishing Digitial Scholarship

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop A: 9:00am-12:00pm Session Type: Half-Day Workshop

This half-day workshop will guide and encourage authors interested in composing digital scholarship for online journals and presses. Editors from _Enculturation_, _Kairos_, and _Technoculture_ will discuss authoring processes from the beginning of research projects to the publication stage, including visualizing, storyboarding/prototyping, creating sustainable and accessible designs, querying editors, finding local resources, submitting webtexts, and revising in-progress work. Authors interested in starting (or finishing) any kind of digital scholarly project will benefit from this workshop.

Schedule of Activities:
9:00  -   9:30 Introductions and overview of the journals represented at the workshop
9:30  - 10:30 Interactive Q&A with all editors -- topics include
     (a) reading the journal's website for info
     (b) queries to the editor (how much info to include & which section/editor, if pertinent, to consider)
     (c) generalities of peer-review process
     (d) rhetorical design tips / best practices
     (e) accessibility, usability, code-level best practices

10:30 - 11:30 Small group work focused on participant needs (feedback on specific projects or how-to-get-started for participants who don't yet have a project in mind)

11:30 - 12:00 Wrap-up conversation; encourage participants to submit.

Tags: Collaboration, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop B: 1:00pm-4:00pm

Processing the Ways We Research, Teach, and Write (with) Digital Information

Room: Tompkins 112 Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop B: 1:00pm-4:00pm Session Type: Half-Day Workshop
Tags: Code Studies, Digital Scholarship, Social Media