2012 Conference Schedule

Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15

Vibrant Materiality: Composing Matters with New Media

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Connecting digital media to the materiality of things and physical environments, this panel addresses strategies for analyzing and producing new media compositions attuned to the dynamic forces of software and hardware. The materiality of composing with new media creates the conditions for vibrant sensual experiences and richly intelligent architectures.

Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Spaces, Materiality

Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45

ConTEXTualizing Identity through (re)Mediation

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel is an exploration of identity in digital, multi-modally mediated environments.

Speaker 1: Techno/rhetorician or Compo/technician: How Does a Digital Scholar Define an Academic Identity?
Speaker 2: The Writer as Architect:  One Fiction Writer's Attempts to Navigate Authorial Identity in New Media
Speaker 3: Weathering the Post-Modern: A Mormon’s Graduate School Literacy Narratives

Tags: Digital Humanities, Identity, Multimodal Composition

Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30

Why Yes, We are Digital Humanists!

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Featured Session

The digital humanities (DH) have received significant attention in the past few years: in academic presses, funding agencies, blogs, and at academic conferences -- including C & W 2011, which included a much-discussed townhall session titled “Are you a Digital Humanist?” Yet, while DH has garnered significant support in traditional liberal arts disciplines, including history and literary studies, the field of computers and writing (C & W) has been slower to respond to this emerging field. This response is puzzling, given the similar interests shared by the two fields in scholarship, pedagogy, and collaborative and interdisciplinary work. This roundtable will discuss ways to encourage broader participation in DH, considering points of resistance or hesitation within C & W that have limited our participation so far. The session will foreground some successful research projects taking place at the intersections of C & W and DH, while also exposing how C & W scholars already working on digital matters might reframe their work to productively expand the meaning and scope of “digital humanities.”

Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarship, Humanities Computing

Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30

The ARchiTEXTure of Mobile World Browsers

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Spaces, Pedagogy

Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45

Compose Yourself: Creating Digital Teaching Philosophies

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: CREATE!

In this CREATE! workshop, participants will be coached through the process of composing digital teaching philosophies, either as part of traditional teaching philosophy, or as a new media object.  Some of the questions we will consider in this workshop:

How should we frame new media pedagogy as part of our scholarly agenda?
How can we talk about our new media assignments as more than classroom practice narratives by making them a substantial part of our teacherly identities?
How do new media objects and digital spaces enhance (or complicate) the ways we construct ourselves as teachers?

Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarship, Digital Spaces

Me Teacher, You Expert: The Promises and Practices of Digital Nativity

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel tests digital nativity as a pedagogical approach and attempts to find its limits as a tool for theorizing students' relationships with digital technology. As teachers at a regional state university, the panelists teach a primarily first-generation college student population that responds positively to exercises that build their confidence in writing with technology, and yet both panelists are uncomfortable with the term "digital natives" in its colonial implications, as well as its inaccurate suggestions about the assumed technological mastery of students.

Tags: Digital Humanities, First-Year Writing Courses, Pedagogy

Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15

Electronic Communication and the Expectations of the Academy: Where Do We Go from Here?

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel explores the intersection of electronic communication norms and conventions of academic discourse as well as the impact of extranoematic responsibilities. Panelists will specifically address collaborative authoring, social media, and the future of online teaching, drawing connections between cybertextuality, electronic communication, and the expectations of the Academy.

Speaker 1: “Meanwhile, in an Entirely Different Thread”: Reading 4chan as Cybertext
Speaker 2: iWrite Cool: Teaching Academic Writing through Conventions of Social Media Discourse
Speaker 3: Cracks in the Foundation or Enlarging the Space?  eCore Curriculum in Georgia

Tags: Digital Humanities, Multimodal Composition, Social Media

Let’s Review: Design & Results of a Large-Scale Study of the Relationship Between Peer Review Quality and Writing Improvement

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

We examine rationales for teaching students to be good reviewers of others’ work in a writing course. One of these seems to relate to the nature and quality of review activity: review activity helps writers make otherwise tacit knowledge about writing more explicit, and so we would expect to see students who engage in review to improve as writers.

Tags: Digital Humanities, Pedagogy, Research and Methodology

Screencasting in Research and Teaching: New Methods of Study in New Media

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel outlines new methods for researching with online data, and for teaching with screencasting software. We highlight methods for analyzing the circulations of text in social networks; outline screencasting news websites for data collection; assess the utility of screencasting methods in classrooms to enhance peer-to-peer feedback.

Speaker 1: Disappearing online data?: Screen capture as a research method
Speaker 2: Camtasia in the Classroom: A Comparative Study of Students Providing Audio/Video Feedback via Camtasia and Written Feedback via Google Docs
Speaker 3: The Next Movement: Engaging Interdisciplinary Methods in the Study of New Media Texts in Circulation

Tags: Digital Humanities, Research and Methodology

Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15

Hacking the Classroom: A Roundtable of Lightning Talks

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: Roundtable

With hacking in mind, these panelists (who hail from disparate institutions, levels, and disciplines) will briefly engage the following questions: “Why does the higher ed classroom need to be hacked, and how might we hack it?” They will also provide particular examples of their own hacking practices, or their aspirations to hack the classroom at their respective institutions, while addressing some obstacles, enthusiasms, and curiosities encountered along the way.

Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarships, Multiliteracies

Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45

Controversy and Composition: A Discussion of Writing in a Technologically Mediated World

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

As the millennial generation moves into the university, questions concerning the effects of technology on composition become more and more pressing. This panel will discuss the ramifications of computing and writing in a technologically mediated world, including the human cost of composition, the digitization of texts, and online course pedagogy.

 
Speaker 1: The Google Books Debate and its Implications on Teaching and Scholarship
Speaker 2: Deconstructing an Ill-Constructed Online Course
 
Tags: Digital Humanities, Humanities Computing, Infrastructure

How to talk about DITA in the writing classroom (without being super rich or super geeky)

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Speakers on this panel will discuss how the ever-changing digital landscape must be reflected in the tools we use in our teaching, scholarship, and production practices. Speakers will address teaching DITA in a writing classroom, extending scholarship through social media, and the need for an open paradigm for digital production.

Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Spaces, Multiliteracies

Putting Our Multimedia Where Our Mouth Is: The Architexture of a New MA Concentration

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Panel title: Building New Architextures: Three Approaches to Institutional Realization of the Digital Turn

Panel abstract: By explaining initiatives from three distinct institutional sites—the English MA, the university writing center, and the HBCU—these panelists share approaches to creating curricular, physical, and online spaces that support digital multimodal composing. Taken together, they argue a necessary step to enacting institutional change is architextual innovation.

Speaker 1: Putting Our Multimedia Where Our Mouth Is: The Architexture of a New MA Concentration
Speaker 2: Social Future, Social Center:  Constructing a Multiliteracy Center Within a University Learning Commons
Speaker 3: Under Construction: HBCUsOnline.com and the Future Implications of the Historically Black Institutio

Tags: Collaboration, Digital Humanities, Writing Studies

Web Development as Intervention in ArchiTEXTural Systems: Social Software for Enhanced User Empowerment, Collaboration, and Cultural/Critical Inquiry

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

We argue that the changing digital landscape presents an opportunity for computers and writing scholars, as well as technical communicators, to intervene in existing systems by contributing to the development of social software that allows for enhanced user empowerment, collaboration, and cultural/critical inquiry.

Speakers 1&2: Baked Potato: Supporting User Differences in the US Food System
Speaker 2: DHShare: Facilitating Student Research Differently in the Digital Age
Speaker 3: The CDA App: Conceptualizing a Digital/Cultural Intervention in Critical Research Practices

Tags: Digital Humanities, Research and Methodology, Social Media