Computers and Writing 2012
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
Onsite Conference: Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Sunday, May 20, 2012

Things to know!

Parking permits will be available for free at registration in Tompkins Hall and at Syme Residence Hall
Each presentation room has a PC, laptop hookup, wireless, projection, video, sound, doc cam, and DVD player. Mac users need to bring their adapter.

2012 Final Schedule

Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15

Composing an Occupation: Technology and the Occupy Movement

Room: Tompkins G109 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

"Occupy Wall Street." The phrase strikes fear in the heart of bank executives and scholars alike: everyone knows that in order to win an argument you need to have an argument. This panel explores richer rhetorical and cultural implications of the movement, focusing on situated knowledge, transformative access, memes, and enthymemes.

Speaker 1: Occupied:  race, writing, and the problem of diversity in the occupy wall street movement

Speaker 2: The Occupy Wall Street Argument: Putting the Meme in Enthymeme

  • Tyler Branson,
    Texas Christian University
  • Jeff Swift,
    North Carolina State University
Tags: Open Source, Social Action, Social Media

Composing and Constructing Student/Instructor Identities in Digital Spaces

Room: Tompkins 112 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Speaker 1: Facebook, Research Writing, and Student Identity
Speaker 2: Multimodality and Identities in Digital Terrains
Speaker 3: Developing Online Teacher Social Presence in Hybrid Writing Classes

  • Lee-Ann Kastman Breuch,
    University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
  • Keith Harms,
    University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
  • Brigitte Mussack,
    University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
  • Jacqueline Schiappa,
    University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Tags: Identity, Pedagogy, Social Media

Creation, (re)Creation, and Participation: The Indigenous Interface

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel proceeds from the argument that there is much to gain by “including American Indians in the discourse surrounding information technologies” (Haas, 2005). Speakers explore how digital interfaces—specifically web design software, social networking sites, and digital archives—are negotiated so as to encourage an active American Indian presence.

  • Kristin Arola (Speaker 1),
    Washington State University
  • Pamela Chisum (Speaker 2),
    Washington State University
  • Shawn Lamebull (Speaker 3),
    Washington State University
  • Angela Haas (chair),
    Illinois State University
Tags: Pedagogy, Race, Social Media

Foundations & Frames: Enabling & Sustaining Curricular and Pedagogical Structures for Multimodal Composition

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Featured Session

How do we best make textual-to-digital transitions from a curricular perspective? In a multilingual society, how can multimodal composition foster language diversity? Who bears the costs of integrating technology and multimodality into our pedagogy? Building upon Chomseky, Gee, Goggin and Trimbur, this panel explores these questions in conjunction with digital/multimodal composition.

Speaker 1: Using Multimodal Composition to Foster Language Diversity
Speaker 2: At What Price? Cost-shifting and Corporatization in Composition
Speaker 3: Complex Construction: Digital Literacies in First-Year Writing Curricula

  • Amanda Athon,
    Bowling Green State University
  • Laurel Adams,
    Bowling Green State University
  • G. Bret Bowers,
    Bowling Green State University
Tags: Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition, Writing Program Administration

Invention Mobs: Recreating Creativity and Collaboration in the Writing Classroom

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: CREATE!

Invention mobs are constructive assemblages of organized chaos which emerge from a collaborative and creative activity. In classrooms, invention mobs can teach students how to have confidence in their own creative ability and how to collaborate with others. We'd like to model the invention mob as a way of creating pedagogical materials and constructing interinstitutional teaching networks.

  • Leeann Hunter,
    Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Roger Whitson ,
    Emory University
Tags: Collaboration, First-Year Writing Courses, Pedagogy

New Media Activism

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Citizens are increasingly using social media venues and multimodal texts as a means of sharing their public voices on compelling issues. This panel looks at the dynamic nature of user-generated content on Web 2.0 sites and the new opportunities these sites bring for political activism and raising awareness about social issues.

Speaker 1: Embodiment and Social Media: The Role of Twitter in the Egyptian Revolution
Speaker 2: Fighting for Civil Rights on YouTube: Identity construction in a gay family's videos

  • Katherine Bridgman,
    Florida State University
  • Caroline Dadas,
    Montclair State
Tags: Digital Spaces, Social Action, Social Media

Stop, Collaborate, and Listen: The Construction of Community in a Hybrid Graduate Cohort

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

A central concern of graduate programs is cohort cohesion. A strong cohort can serve as a resource for all involved, not only functioning as a social group, but promoting research, supporting coursework, and improving student retention and completion. Unfortunately, developing a strong cohort can be a challenge--especially when its members are distributed geographically. This panel will examine the key practices employed by one such cohort to develop cohesion.

Speaker 1: That’s What She Said’: Humor, Performance, and Collaboration
Speaker 2: Bring It On’: The Use of Music Exchange to Construct Identity and Affirm Social Bonds
Speaker 3: Passing Notes in Class: The Ubiquitous Role of In-Class Synchronous Chat
Speaker 4: Hey Peeps, Remember When . . .’ :  Social Media and Shared Experiences for Geographically Scattered Cohorts

  • Megan Mize,
    Old Dominion University
  • Mark Blaauw-Hara,
    North Central Michigan College and Old Dominion University
  • Danielle Roney Roach,
    Old Dominion University
  • Cheri Lemieux Spiegel,
    Northern Virginia Community College and Old Dominion University
Tags: Collaboration, Digital Spaces, Identity

The ArchiTEXTure of the Digital: Three Perspectives on the Durability, Utility, and Beauty of Incorporating Digital Components into the Writing Classroom

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel discusses pedagogical difficulties and issues of access when incorporating digital components into a traditional composition classroom, a distributed-learning classroom, and an online classroom. Drawing on classical principles of architecture, the presenters will address the durability, utility, and beauty of using digital components when teaching writing. 

Speaker 1: Designing the Distributed -Learning Classroom(s): Using Online Tools for Building Community and Social Presence
Speaker 2: Reconstructing the Classroom: Moving from Physical Place to Digital Space
Speaker 3: From Construction Paper to Photoshop: Finding Ways of Incorporating Visual Literacies into the Writing Classroom

  • Lauren Garcia-DuPlain,
    The University of Akron
  • Jennifer Cunningham,
    Stark State College
  • Penelope Quade,
    The Ohio State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, First-Year Writing Courses, Pedagogy

Understanding Online Literate Practices

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel begins to explore the ways literacy functions in multimodal texts.  Using multimodal texts and communities that engage multimodal texts, this panel focuses on how literate acts function as a means to understand current multiliteracies in popular culture.  As well, this panel focuses on the processes that take place when creating multimodal texts, thus providing an overview of both multimodal product and process.

Speaker 1: Moving Memes into an Internet Culture
Speaker 2: Capturing and Studying Multimodal Composing Processes
Speaker 3: What’s Your Secret?: How Meanings and Uses of Texts Can Shape Literacy, Community, and Sponsorship

  • Chelsea Swick,
    Kent State University
  • Pamela Takayoshi,
    Kent State University
  • Sarah Oliveri,
    Kent State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition

Vibrant Materiality: Composing Matters with New Media

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Connecting digital media to the materiality of things and physical environments, this panel addresses strategies for analyzing and producing new media compositions attuned to the dynamic forces of software and hardware. The materiality of composing with new media creates the conditions for vibrant sensual experiences and richly intelligent architectures.

  • Jeremy Tirrell,
    University of North Carolina Wilmington
  • Jason Kalin,
    North Carolina State University
  • Victoria Gallagher,
    North Carolina State University
  • Kyle Vealey,
    Purdue University
Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Spaces, Materiality

Whither the Prosumer?: The Creative Economy and Emerging Forms of Scholarly Communication

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn describes U.S. citizens as Internet “consumers,” separating these consumers from the “creative economy.” She repeatedly uses this binary to distinguish the people who use the Internet from those who create its content. This illustrates a failure to recognize prosumers, those who simultaneously create and access the Internet. The panel will examine prosumption from perspectives ranging from the attention economy to social communities to digital scholarly communication.

Speaker 1: Context-Providers in an Attention Economy
Speaker 2: Folksonomy as Gift: Motivations for Social Tagging
Speaker 3: Working in the Bubble Factory: Prosumer Humanists and Scholarshift
Speaker 4: Prosumers and Algorithmic Truth

  • Jentery Sayers,
    University of Victoria
  • Noel Radley,
    Santa Clara University
  • Daniel Anderson,
    University of North Carolina
  • John Jones,
    West Virginia University
Tags: Collaboration, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

“But I Can’t Find That in the MLA Guide”: Teaching Digital Citation Rhetorically

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Friday Session A: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Roundtable

The complexity of citing sources and defining plagiarism in a convergence culture (Jenkins, 2006) is being productively explored through Jamieson and Howard’s Citation Project, and other scholars have investigated the rhetorical function of citation both inside (for example, Davis 2000 and Knight-Davis & Sung 2008) and outside the classroom (for example, Conners 1999, Rose 1993 and 1999). Little attention in our field has been paid to the “how” of citation, however, leaving teachers to fall back on the “find an example, and copy it” method of instruction. This roundtable argues that we must revise the way we teach students how to cite.

  • Susan Miller-Cochran,
    North Carolina State University
  • Shelley Rodrigo,
    Old Dominion University
Tags: First-Year Writing Courses, Multiliteracies, Pedagogy

Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45

Building Classroom archiTEXTure in Tough Economic Times: Deploying 21st Century Writing

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Roundtable
  • Elizabeth Monske,
    Northern Michigan University
  • Lanette Cadle,
    Missouri State University
  • Christopher Sean Harris,
    California State University-Los Angeles
Tags: Collaboration, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

ConTEXTualizing Identity through (re)Mediation

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel is an exploration of identity in digital, multi-modally mediated environments.

Speaker 1: Techno/rhetorician or Compo/technician: How Does a Digital Scholar Define an Academic Identity?
Speaker 2: The Writer as Architect:  One Fiction Writer's Attempts to Navigate Authorial Identity in New Media
Speaker 3: Weathering the Post-Modern: A Mormon’s Graduate School Literacy Narratives

  • Elkie Burnside,
    Oklahoma State University
  • James Brubaker,
    Oklahoma State University
  • Steven Hopkins,
    Oklahoma State University
Tags: Digital Humanities, Identity, Multimodal Composition

Doing, Not Drifting: Online Tool Building As Research and Composition

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Roundtable

This roundtable will challenge the notion that online technologies should automate and commercialize education by presenting a hybrid approach to teaching and learning writing with in-class and extra-curricular layers. Comprised of undergraduate and graduate students who are actively collaborating on a multi-year research initiative to build a peer-reviewed online journal to publish undergraduate scholarship, this roundtable will respond to speculations about student disengagement. These student-researchers will argue that online social networking technologies foreground the social dimension of writing without leading students “adrift.”

  • Ashley Hall, Chair,
    University of North Carolina
  • Doreen Thierauf,
    University of North Carolina
  • Laurel Foote-Hudson,
    University of North Carolina
  • Ashley Guy,
    University of North Carolina
  • Ben Whitley,
    University of North Carolina
  • Sydney Stegall,
    University of North Carolina
  • Joe Albernaz,
    University of North Carolina
  • Edward Hedrick,
    University of North Carolina
  • Carlos Rodriguez,
    University of North Carolina
  • Jill Dwiggins,
    University of Massachusetts
  • Adam McCune,
    University of North Carolina
  • Chris Rota,
    University of North Carolina
  • Britt Spruill,
    University of North Carolina
  • Alex Ward,
    University of North Carolina
Tags: Collaboration, Pedagogy, Social Media

Ethics in Online Spaces

Room: Tompkins G109 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel explores the role that online spaces and digital media play in constructing our perception of self and other. While online spaces can provide possibilities for empowerment and self-definition, they can also be repressive spaces that distance and negatively characterize disenfranchised groups. Thus, for teachers hoping to impart their students with a critical understanding of online spaces, ethical literacy is an essential component.

Speaker 1: “I Didn’t Think about That”: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Teaching Ethical Literacy in  Writing Instruction
Speaker 2:The New Scarlet Letter A: The Power of Online Informational Websites to Silence & “Brand” the Autism Community
Speaker 3: The Pedagogy of Race in the Digital ‘Post-Anti-Essentialist’ Turn.

  • Toby F. Coley,
    University of Mary Hardin-Baylor
  • Barbi Smyser-Fauble,
    Illinois State University
  • Seth Mulliken,
    North Carolina State University
Tags: First-Year Writing Courses, Multiliteracies, Pedagogy

Gaming as Academic Identity

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Featured Session
  • Doug Eyman,
    George Mason University
  • Emi Bunner,
    University of North Carolina--Chapel Hill
  • Cynthia Haynes,
    Clemson University
  • Jan Holmevik,
    Clemson University
  • Mary Karcher,
    Wayne State University
  • Jill Morris,
    Frostburg State University
  • Scott Reed,
    Georgia Gwinnett College
Tags:

Re-thinking Writer Identity through Production

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel examines three ways in which identity is composed through production: participating in the knitting/crocheting social network Ravelry, making traditional and digital crafts, and creating infographics that represent digital writing practices. Together, these disparate projects contribute to ongoing conversations about writer identity in the digital age.

Speaker 1: More Than Stitch and Bitch: Identity Practices on Ravelry and Beyond
Speaker 2: “So... We get to make stuff?”: DIY craft, new media and production
Speaker 3: Time on Our Side: A (De)Mystification of Literacy Practices - Lynn

  • Amber Buck,
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Kristin Prins,
    UW-Milwaukee
  • Lynn C. Lewis,
    Oklahoma State University
Tags: Identity, Materiality, Social Media

Remixing the Digital: Intellectual Property in Gaming and the Classroom

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel explores fair use and the remixing of digital media. Panelists argue for remix as a method to create voice and new meaning, the rhetorical dimensions of intellectual property rights, and how multimodal projects allow new forms of connection in digital spaces.

Speaker 1: Same Game, New Rules: Conflating Fair Use and File Sharing
Speaker 2:The Law of Play and Infringing Avatars: Worlds.com, Inc v NCSoft Corp
Speaker 3: Digital Literacy Acquisition and Digital Resource Networking: What Are We Asking Students to Do in Multimodal Assignments?

  • Michael Neal,
    Florida State University
  • Joshua Daniel-Wariya,
    Texas Christian University
  • Julia Voss,
    Ohio State University
Tags: Multimodal Composition, Pedagogy

Structural and Expressive Foundations in Multimedia Authoring

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel maps the “architextual” foundations of multimedia practices in a series of introductory courses entitled IML 140: Workshop in Multimedia Authoring at  the University of Southern California’s Institute for Multimedia Literacy (IML). Housed in the School of Cinematic Arts, the IML approach is premised on the notion that students must be able to not only read and write words, but to use and critique images, sound, typography, design, networks and other media-based tools. As such, this course provides the foundation for the IML’s Minor in Digital Studies, as well as the Honors in Multimedia Scholarship Program. 

  • Marc Fernandez,
    USC
  • Evan Hughes,
    USC
  • DJ Johnson,
    USC
  • Elizabeth Ramsey,
    USC
  • Virginia Kuhn (MODERATOR),
    USC, MODERATOR
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition, Pedagogy

Teaching and Learning through Spectacle

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel explores the participation of new media objects in the long tradition of teaching and learning through spectacle.  We consider how teacher- and student-produced media objects adapt or re-present antecedent spaces and figures.  We examine, in particular, how students are architecturally positioned to respond to pedagogical spectacle.

Speaker 1: Seeing Double: Digital Media Analogues in Spectacular Eighteenth-Century Science Displays
Speaker 2: Viral Video and the Bad Teacher
Speaker 3: Playspace Pedagogy
Speaker 4: Celebrity Pedagogy and the Famous Writers School
Speaker 5: Database Video and Response as Composition

  • Chelsea Redeker,
    UNC Chapel Hill
  • Alex Funt,
    UNC Chapel Hill
  • Emily Bunner,
    UNC Chapel Hill
  • Phil Sandick,
    UNC Chapel Hill
  • Jason Loan,
    UNC Chapel Hill
Tags: Collaboration, Pedagogy, Visual Studies

The Architexture of Tumblr

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Speaker 1: "The Revolution will (not) be organized: Tagging as Social and Rhetorical Practice in Tumblr"
Speaker 2: "Distinctively Similar: Collectively Assembling the Tumblr Ethos"
Speaker 3: "The Craft of Tumbling: Tumblr as Multi-Modal Digital Scrapbook"

  • Elizabeth Davis,
    University of Georgia
  • Anita Derouen,
    Millsaps College
  • Sujata Iyengar,
    University of Georgia
Tags: Materiality, Social Media, Writing Studies

The “Googleization” of Academia and the Impact on Teaching Web Design in Writing Courses

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel focuses on one research extensive institution in the southeast, and explores the implications of a set of decisions that occurred before and after the migration to Google’s service offerings.  In adopting Google’s email and other resources (a data for security trade?), IT departments across the nation have been able to radically cut costs, and in our specific situation, this transition has resulted in an even further erosion of support for the teaching of web design in writing courses.

  • Janice Walker,
    Georgia Southern University
  • Tim Giles,
    Georgia Southern University
  • Angela Crow,
    Georgia Southern University
Tags: Infrastructure, Pedagogy, Writing Studies

Using Corpus Linguistics to Assess Student Writing

Room: Tompkins 112 Session Time: Friday Session B: 11:30-12:45 Session Type: CREATE!

Participants will learn how to use Antconc, a free online concordancer that offers systematic analysis of recurring patterns of language use in electronic versions of student texts, either participants' own or ours.  Participants will also discuss how "move analysis" and carefully developed prompts can facilitate best use of the software.

  • Anne Ruggles Gere,
    University of Michigan
  • Zak Lancaster,
    University of Michigan
  • Justine Neiderhiser,
    University of Michigan
Tags: Digital Assessment, Infrastructure

Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00

Appealing, Addressing, Involving: Putting Audience Front and Center

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

There is general consensus that asking students to write for “real audiences” helps them better understand the role of audience in the composing process. Proponents of digital technologies as teaching tools cite the ability to reach “real” audiences as a benefit of multimodal and online composition; however, students often have little understanding of audience, much less the complexities of online audiences.This panel will focus on the difficulties of teaching a complex and nuanced understanding of audience in the digital age and strategies for overcoming these difficulties in the classroom.

Speaker 1: An Appeal to Anyone: Finding and Founding Online Audiences
Speaker 2: Audience(s) Addressed: Who is this text (really) for?
Speaker 3: Audience Involved”:  Using Audience Theory and Collaborative Usability To Analyze Audience and Community

  • Chris Blankenship,
    University of Colorado - Colorado Springs
  • Catherine Braun,
    The Ohio State University - Marion
  • Deanna Mascle,
    Morehead State University - Morehead, Ky
Tags: Digital Spaces, Pedagogy, Writing Studies

Archi-TEXT-ures of Identity: The Impact of Web 2.0 on Graduate Student Representation

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Focusing in on ePortfolios and various social networking sites, this panel will explore how graduate students build identities in digital spaces. In doing this, we hope to question such assumptions as: 1) singular vs. multiple identities and the ability to control self-representation; 2) how building a digital identity affects face-to-face identity within a classroom environment; and 3) a professional/personal divide on public digital spaces.

Speaker 1: Shaky Foundations: Establishing Professional Identity in Digital Spaces
Speaker 2: 'Pardon Our Dust’: Graduate Student Identity Reconstruction on Professional Social Networking Sites
Speaker 3: In Search of the ‘Dislike’ Button: a Call for the Discretionary use of Self-Affirming Technologies in the Composition Classroom

  • Kristine L. Blair,
    Bowling Green State University
  • Mariana Grohowski,
    Bowling Green State University
  • Ken Hayes ,
    Bowling Green State University
  • Matthew A. Bridgewater,
    Bowling Green State University
Tags: Identity, Multimodal Composition, Social Media

ArchiTEXTure of Invention in Two Writing Centers: New Media and the Multimodal Invention Process

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

We explore in what ways the invention process of video composition may be different from that of traditional written texts. Pressing questions include:
What ways can we think about invention processes and visual semiotics? How can we encourage students to become inventive through visual conceptualizations?
What is the role of architecture in the invention process of new media products? What meaning does the physical space of interaction have in new media invention?

  • Sohui Lee,
    Stanford University
  • Russell Carpenter,
    Eastern Kentucky University
  • Christine Alfano,
    Stanford University
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition

Composing in the dark: The texture of long exposure light painting

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: ConstrucTEXT

 

Composition teachers often assign multimodal projects in their classrooms. While we focus on the rhetorical choices and technological skills needed to create, we often undervalue the role that mental imaging and affect play in the composition process. This participatory session incorporates long exposure photography and LED Light Painting to compose with the texture of light.  To see examples of light painting visit: http://jennifer-ware.com/lightpainting

Participants: This interactive session can only accommodate a limited number of participants (15-20) as there will be stations comprised of a digital camera, multiple colors and styles of LEDs, and scenes/air ”canvases” to paint with light.  Everyone will receive the compositions as zip files via email after the workshop.

  • Jennifer Ware,
    North Carolina State University
Tags: Materiality, Visual Studies

Differential Makings: Enacting Theories of Raced Experience in Digital Writing Research and Pedagogy

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Featured Session

Foundational Computers and Writing scholarship has called for attention toward how diverse groups use technology, including identifying oppressive systems that deny technological access and better understanding racially situated embodied experiences with writing technologies. However, shifting from acknowledging a need for multiplicitous perspectives to actively enacting diverse ways of making meaning is complex work. Gloria Anzaldúa, for one, has cautioned us about approaches that “allude to the category, cite a few women-of-color texts, tack on a token book to their syllabus and assume they’ve dealt with race.” With these complexities in mind, panelists ask: How might we put differential ways of making meaning at the theoretical center of Computers and Writing teaching and research? How do we build accounts of raced experience with technology that retain the complex constellations of objects, stories, and people that intersect in digital writing?

Speaker 1: “Messy” Research: How to Listen and See the Mess of Access Enacted
Speakers 2 and 3: Operationalizing
Conocimiento: Enacting Chicana Rhetoric in Computers and Writing Pedagogy and Research

  • Douglas Walls,
    University of Central Florida
  • Stacey Pigg,
    University of Central Florida
  • Kendall Leon,
    Purdue University
Tags: Race, Research and Methodology

Empowerment Through Digital Discourse: Potentials for Digital Literacy in Blogging, Digital Storytelling, and E-Learning

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel will explore multimodal consumerism in digital music blogs, digital storytelling and collaborative rhetoric in communities of developmentally disabled individuals, and the implications of changing authorship on e-learning and accessibility.

Speaker 1: Digital Literacy and Music Blogging: Consumers, Creators, and Evolving Authorship
Speaker 2: Disability Rhetoric in a Digital World: Digital Storytelling with Developmentally Disabled Individuals
Speaker 3: Visual Literacy, Authorship and Potentials for E-learning

  • Liz Lane,
    DePaul University
  • Kimberly Coon,
    DePaul University
  • Heather Eidson,
    DePaul University
Tags: Accessibility, Digital Spaces, Multimodal Composition

Into the mix: Technologies in the First Year Writing Classroom

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

First Year composition students come to us with a variety of technological capabilities and interests. This panel explores how instructors at different institutions and in different learning environments take advantage of the tools they have to enhance their classrooms. Using these tools can help address technological anxiety, encourage a more nuanced writing process, and challenge the boundaries of the traditional classroom.

Speaker 1: "I Don't Know What You Want":  Using Google Docs in Writing Workshops to Create Sample Student Papers
Speaker 2: “I’d Rather Hand Write the Assignment: Easing Student Transition to Multi-Modal Writing”
Speaker 3: #Post Pedagogy: Twitter and a Pedagogy of the Act

  • Karla Lyles,
    Georgia Southern University
  • Abigail A. Grant,
    College of the Albemarle
  • Megan McIntyre,
    University of South Florida
Tags: Collaboration, First-Year Writing Courses, Pedagogy

Invention in the Age of Electronic Literacy

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel explores invention in the age of electric literacy:  the effect on science learning when an elementary classroom shifts from a conventional to a digital space, the use of sketchnotes that bring the visual modalities of electracy to invention, and Web 2.0 technologies used for invention in composition classes.

  • Michael Carter,
    North Carolina State University
  • Eric N. Wiebe,
    North Carolina State University
  • Scott Nelson,
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Lilian Mina,
    Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Tags: Digital Spaces, Pedagogy

Performing Online: Opportunities and Challenges in Digital Spaces

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

From the impact of social media in the composition classroom, to the management of sexual identity in video blogs, to the importance of site design for Internet credibility, this panel considers the opportunities and challenges of digital spaces as realms where our personal, professional, and academic lives are increasingly enacted.

Speaker 1: Blogsolation: The Impact of Coming Out Blogs and Videos on Gay Identity
Speaker 2:Facebook Use Among First-Year Composition Students
Speaker 3: Managing an Online Identity: "Distributed Credibility" in Digital Spaces

  • Fernando Sanchez,
    Purdue University
  • Ryan Shepherd,
    Arizona State University
  • Geoffrey Middlebrook,
    University of Southern California
Tags: Identity, Social Action, Social Media

Pinch, Tap, Swipe: Using iPads to Rethink the Construction of Digital Texts and Spaces

Room: Tompkins G109 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Roundtable

This roundtable examines how tablet computers, specifically the iPad, are used as both an archiTEXTure object and a medium for constructing the archiTEXTure of writing spaces, particularly the writing center. We look at how this new media technology enhances and challenges the way we engage students in their writing process, how we facilitate workshops and give presentations, and consider the iPad as a material object and mobile composition tool, as well as examine the wide and varied uses of tablets across life spaces.

  • Dianna Baldwin,
    Michigan State
  • John Lauckner,
    Michigan State
  • Rachael Hodder,
    Michigan State
  • Casey Miles,
    Michigan State
  • Dean Holden,
    Michigan State
Tags: Digital Spaces, Materiality, Multimodal Composition

The Problem Is Local: How Looking at Computers Sometimes Stops Us From Seeing Writing

Room: Tompkins 112 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

The situations of students' networked writing increasingly require us to rethink spaces of representation and value as enacted in conventional dichotomies between "local" and "global" and between "online" and "real life." Each panelist demonstrates how these conventional dichotomies are becoming increasingly fraught.

  • Linh Dich,
    University of Massachusetts at Amherst
  • Mike Edwards,
    United States Military Academy at West Point
  • Mike Trice,
    Texas Tech University
  • Leslie Bradshaw,
    University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Tags: Materiality, Multiliteracies, Writing Studies

Writing Beyond Classroom Walls

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Friday Session C: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel looks at the variety of ways that classroom projects can extend beyond the physical bounds of the classroom and institution, into dynamic situations with authentic audiences. Panelists will explore service learning, blogging, and transdiciplinary multimodal projects as productive means of expanding the composition classroom.

Speaker 1: Beyond Reflection: Writing Digitally with Communities in Service Learning
Speaker 2: For Real this Time, Taking the Composition Classroom Online and Outside of School
Speaker 3: Tuning archiTEXTure for Transdisciplinary Contexts

  • Stacy Nall,
    Purdue University
  • Kathryn Trauth Taylor,
    Purdue University
  • Marc C. Santos,
    University of South Florida
  • Mark H. Leahy,
    University of South Florida
  • Mark Hannah,
    Arizona State University
Tags: Collaboration, Digital Spaces, Social Action

Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30

Catalysts and Cataclysms: Personal, Institutional, Pedagogical Narratives of the Digital Text

Room: Tompkins 112 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

As panelists, we use personal and scholarly narrative and multi-media performance to explore how the underpinnings of “writing” shift in the production of digital texts. Collectively, we argue for a wider affective and non-discursive (Murray) rhetorical lens for theorizing the production of digital scholarly texts and digital writing assignments.  It is our goal to challenge our audience, as we challenge ourselves and our students, to understand the production of digital texts as a series of generative leaps, rather than as a flow, from text to the screen.

  • Ames Hawkins,
    Columbia College Chicago
  • Alanna Frost,
    University of Alabama Huntsville
  • Suzanne Blum Malley,
    Columbia College Chicago
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multiliteracies, Writing Studies

Creating Mobile Technologies for Composing Global Spaces

Room: Tompkins G109 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Three perspectives--writing center, professional writing, and instructor/programmer--on a mobile computing project articulate students’ digital composing and research. Design prototypes will be presented and the audience is invited to respond in an effort to crowdsource the design of a tool for writing “in the wild” away from the desktop.

  • Tammy Conard-Salvo,
    Purdue University
  • Michael Salvo,
    Purdue University
  • Adam Strantz,
    Purdue University
Tags: Collaboration, Infrastructure, Research and Methodology

Designed Assumptions: Reflecting on Technology in Reading and Writing Classrooms

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

As technologies become more “invisible” in reading and writing classrooms, it is critical that educators reflect upon the implicit assumptions that are designed into such technologies. This panel will critically reflect upon technologies that are currently embedded in classrooms, highlighting the implications of these designed assumptions for accessibility and pedagogy.

  • James Jackson,
    Michigan State University
  • Daniel Tripp,
    Penn State University
Tags: Accessibility, Infrastructure

Developing Transformative Domains for Multimodal Writing Assessment: The Language of Evaluation, the Language of Instruction

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This roundtable will offer several multimodal texts, define and situate our five domains in relationship to the best practices and statements from leading national organizations and the research literature on writing assessment. We will also offer examples across k-16 and out-of-school contexts of how each domain can be used to help writers and teachers talk about composing processes and qualities of multimodal texts.

  • Will Hochman,
    SCSU/NWP Multimodal Assessment Project (MAP) Group
  • Kris Blair,
    Bowling Green U/NWP Multimodal Assessment Project (MAP) Group
  • Carl Whithaus,
    UC Davis/NWP Multimodal Assessment Project (MAP) Group
  • Danielle Nicole DeVoss,
    Michigan State University/NWP Multimodal Assessment Project (MAP) Group
  • Chuck Jurich,
    UNM/NWP Multimodal Assessment Project (MAP) Group
Tags: Digital Assessment, Multimodal Composition

Fostering Connection with Digital Literacy

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel focuses on the role that digital literacy plays in making connections, amongst colleagues or students or news audiences. The role of digital literacy is explored through multiple lenses, including online news websites, collaborative classroom exercises, and educational literacy projects.

Speaker 1: Digital Literacy Acquisition in the Newsroom
Speaker 2: School-Community Connections around Digital Storytelling
Speaker 3: Right Here/Write Now: Digital Technologies for Collaborative Composing between P-12 and University Writing Instructors

  • Yvonne Stephens,
    Kent State University
  • Dickie Selfe,
    OSU
  • Joyce R. Walker,
    Illinois State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Infrastructure, Multiliteracies

Magic, Technology, & Rhetoric: Shifting relationships, identities, & perspectives

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

The first presentation examines how rhetorics of magic structure the relationship between humans and technology. The second considers Starhawk as an example of the identity changes which take place in online environments. The third presents student’s digital literacy narratives, and analyzes those texts for examples of New Media literacy practices.

Speaker 1: Magic, Technology, Rhetoric
Speaker 2: Believers and followers: An examination of the digital and virtual identities of Starhawk
Speaker 3: Remediating Identities: Digital Literacies and the (Re)invention of Multiliterate Voices

  • Steven LeMieux,
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Christine Maddox,
    Florida State University
  • Bret Zawilski,
    Florida State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Materiality

Making-as-Thinking: An Algorhythmic Symphony of Creative-Critical Practice

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: ConstrucTEXT

Rather than marching forward as chrono-logical progression of individual works, each of these twenty-minute periods will be fragmented, intermixed, and redistributed according to a predetermined algorithmic formula across the 90-minute session interval. Session presenters and audience members alike will be invited to witness and participate in the “unfolding” of the composition simultaneously. In this way, what our project ultimately makes will be an extemporaneous emergent arrangement arising from this distributed algorithmic performance.

algorithm:
Project 1 (fade in)
{
   int out, in;
   for(out=nElems-1; out>1; out--) // sit down fade (backward)
   for(in=0; in<out; in++) // stand up (forward)
   if( a[in] > a[in+1] ) // out of order?
   swap(in, in+1); // swap them
} // end conference algorithm (repeat)

  • Jamie "Skye" Bianco,
    University of Pittsburgh
Tags: Digital Spaces, Multimodal Composition, Research and Methodology

O Brave NUI World!: Exploring the Implications of Embodied Computing for Digital Rhetoric and Writing

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

We are on the verge of a paradigm shift in mainstream computing.  The era of the graphical-user interface is waning and will soon be eclipsed by a wide range of natural-user interface technologies, NUIs. Replacing the centrality of the keyboard, mouse, and desktop metaphor are a growing range of computers that are touch- and gesture-activated.  This panel comprises six presenters in order to offer a wide range of perspectives on an emerging issue. Each presentation will be limited to 6-7 minutes leaving plenty of time for discussion.

  • David Blakesley,
    Clemson University
  • Doug Eyman,
    George Mason University
  • David M Rieder,
    NC State University
  • Sarah J. Arroyo,
    California State University Long Beach
  • Ben McCorkle,
    The Ohio State University
Tags: Identity, Multiliteracies, Visual Studies

Studies in Digital Delivery

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel aims to extend recent work on delivery and its relationship to the production of texts in digital environments. Each speaker presents a study demonstrating how the affordances of contemporary rhetorical delivery--in particular, novel forms of audience interaction--can shape the characteristics and production of digital texts.

Speaker 1: Bibliometrics in the Vernacular
Speaker 2: Authors, Readers, Code and Control in Online Texts
Speaker 3: Hacking and the Commercialization of Delivery

  • Tim Laquintano,
    Lafayette College
  • Annette Vee,
    University of Pittsburgh
  • Tim Lockridge,
    Virginia Tech
Tags: Code Studies, Digital Spaces, Writing Studies

University Architextures: Composing Student and Faculty Identities as Digital Writers and Scholars

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

These three speakers will discuss how the design and implementation of a digital writing space, a programmatic writing requirement, and a long-term research initiative at their medium-sized comprehensive liberal arts institution have contributed to students’ and faculty development as digital writers and scholars.

Speaker 1: Center for Undergraduate Publishing and Information Design
Speaker 2: Online senior portfolios
Speaker 3: The transfer of writing strategies from informal to formal digital writing spaces

  • Paula Rosinski,
    Elon University
  • Jessie Moore,
    Elon University
  • Rebecca Pope-Ruark,
    Elon University
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Digital Spaces, Identity

Why Yes, We are Digital Humanists!

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Featured Session

The digital humanities (DH) have received significant attention in the past few years: in academic presses, funding agencies, blogs, and at academic conferences -- including C & W 2011, which included a much-discussed townhall session titled “Are you a Digital Humanist?” Yet, while DH has garnered significant support in traditional liberal arts disciplines, including history and literary studies, the field of computers and writing (C & W) has been slower to respond to this emerging field. This response is puzzling, given the similar interests shared by the two fields in scholarship, pedagogy, and collaborative and interdisciplinary work. This roundtable will discuss ways to encourage broader participation in DH, considering points of resistance or hesitation within C & W that have limited our participation so far. The session will foreground some successful research projects taking place at the intersections of C & W and DH, while also exposing how C & W scholars already working on digital matters might reframe their work to productively expand the meaning and scope of “digital humanities.”

  • Mathew K. Gold,
    New York City College of Technology
  • Kathie Gossett,
    Iowa State University
  • Karl Stolley,
    Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Geoffrey Sauer,
    Iowa State University
  • Liza K. Potts,
    Michigan State University
  • William Hart-Davidson,
    Michigan State University
  • Dean Rehberger,
    Michigan State University
Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarship, Humanities Computing

“Toward a Theory of Digital and Multimodal Course Design”

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Friday Session D: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel focuses on theories and practices informing course designs. Questions it addresses are: What conceptual frameworks inform our course designs? What pedagogies inform our delivery of these courses? How do frameworks and pedagogies shape students’ experiences in the classroom and their understanding of digital and multimodal rhetoric and writing?

Speaker 1: Vision, Rhetoric, and Social Action: Crafting a Theoretical Backdrop for the Multimodal/Multimedia/Multigenre Course
Speaker 2: Integrating Multimodal Composition into the "Writing" Class: A Framework for Teaching and Assessment
Speaker 3: Professional Tip of the Day: Performing an Editorial Pedagogy Makes You A Better Teacher–Editor
Speaker 4: Multimodal Pedagogy in the Wild: Considering Contributions of the Organic Intellectuals

  • Justin M Jory,
    UC-Colorado Springs
  • Lee Odell,
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Cheryl Ball,
    Illinois State University
  • Nathan Johnson,
    Purdue University
Tags: Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition, Writing Studies

Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30

:) | :( Discursive Performance in Digitally Mediated Communication

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
  • Rachael Hodder,
    Digital Rhetoric and Professional Writing, Michigan State University
  • Minh-Tam Nguyen,
    Digital Rhetoric and Professional Writing, Michigan State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Visual Studies

ArchiSEXTture: Getting It On in Digital Dating Spaces

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
  • Kevin Brock,
    North Carolina State University
  • James Burka,
    Epocrates, Inc.
  • Dawn Shepherd,
    Boise State University
Tags: Code Studies, Digital Scholarship, Social Media

Beyond Blackboard?: Joining the Small Pieces

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
  • Amanda Licastro,
    CUNY Graduate Center
Tags: Course Management Systems, First-Year Writing Courses, Pedagogy

Collaborating in 140 Characters: Storify, Twitter, and Flash Fiction in the Composition Classroom

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
  • Dr. Shea Stuart,
    Gardner-Webb University
Tags: Collaboration, First-Year Writing Courses, Multimodal Composition

Open Professional Writing Preview

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation

This presentation will introduce interested users to Open Professional Writing, an open-source course management system.  Based on Drupal 6, Open Professional Writing offers many of the features instructors have come to expect in a CMS, with the added benefit of composition-specific drafting features.   Copies will available for distribution on disk.

  • Adam R Pope,
    Purdue University
Tags: Course Management Systems, Infrastructure, Open Source

Providing the “Big Picture”: Reusable Videos for Teaching the Back Stories of Information Creation, Discovery, and Use

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
  • Kim Duckett,
    North Carolina State University Libraries
  • Anne Burke ,
    North Carolina State University Libraries
Tags: Collaboration, First-Year Writing Courses, Pedagogy

Recreating bpNichol's "First Screening"

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
  • Brent Simoneaux,
    North Carolina State University
  • Samara Mouvery,
    North Carolina State University
  • Fernanda Duarte,
    North Carolina State University
Tags: Code Studies, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

The ARchiTEXTure of Mobile World Browsers

Room: Session Time: Saturday Installation: 2:45-4:30 Session Type: Interactive Installation
  • John Tinnell,
    University of Florida
Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Spaces, Pedagogy

Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45

Compose Yourself: Creating Digital Teaching Philosophies

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: CREATE!

In this CREATE! workshop, participants will be coached through the process of composing digital teaching philosophies, either as part of traditional teaching philosophy, or as a new media object.  Some of the questions we will consider in this workshop:

How should we frame new media pedagogy as part of our scholarly agenda?
How can we talk about our new media assignments as more than classroom practice narratives by making them a substantial part of our teacherly identities?
How do new media objects and digital spaces enhance (or complicate) the ways we construct ourselves as teachers?

  • Faith Kurtyka,
    University of Arizona
  • Ashley J. Holmes,
    University of Arizona
  • Jennifer Haley-Brown,
    University of Arizona
  • Amy Kimme Hea,
    University of Arizona
Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarship, Digital Spaces

Composing in Digital Spaces: Overcoming Barriers and Embracing Opportunities for Scholarship, Professional Writing, and Teaching

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel will focus on the material and immaterial considerations involved in creating new media texts. We focus specifically on three areas of writing research: academic writing, professional writing, and the teaching of writing. Each presentation delineates barriers to successfully composing in digital spaces and suggest ways for overcoming these barriers.

Speaker 1: New Media Publishing Practices: Overcoming Obstacles to Composing Scholarship in Digital Spaces
Speaker 2: Producer, Consumer, or Collaborator?: Reconsidering the Travel Writer’s Role(s) in Writing for Digital Environments
Speaker 3: Why Are We “Thinking like an iPod?”: Critical Considerations for Teaching Writing with Technology

  • Jenna Pack,
    University of Arizona
  • Kristin Mock,
    University of Arizona
  • Marisa Sandoval,
    University of Arizona
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Digital Spaces, Multimodal Composition

Composing in vSpaces: Rhetorical Architext of Second Life

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Speaker 1: Second Life in Henry Miller’s Tropic of Capricorn:  The Rhetoric of Unbridled Self-Expression
Speaker 2: Toulmin and Rogerian Models in Second Life: Creating Supplemental Materials in Virtual Worlds
Speaker 3:  Embodying Our Virtual Writing Center Selves: We Are, Who We are, Who We Are
Speaker 4:  Second Life as Third Space:  Remediating the Somatic Mind

  • Jeffrey Starks,
    Coppin State University
  • Deanya Lattiimore,
    Syracuse University
  • Dianna Baldwin ,
    Michigan State University
  • Cynthia Davidson,
    Stony Brook University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Multimodal Composition

Excavating Feminist Futures

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: ConstrucTEXT

In the move from the printed page to performance, live individuals re-presenting the words of feminist theorists in the context of my original prose, emphasizes the relevance of the body in feminist theory. An accompanying digital piece provides a literal grounding for the spoken words, reinforcing and reinscribing the non-discursive affective elements of feminism, namely the relevance of spirituality to feminist practice.

  • Ames Hawkins,
    Columbia College Chicago
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Gender, Social Action

Like an iPrayer: Religion, Spirituality, and the Digital

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel examines the growing influence of digital media on practices of prayer and spirituality.  We address the relationship between mainline Christianity and digital technologies; the digital re-mediation of prayer via handheld apps; and rhetorical considerations of extra-religious or “spiritual but not religious” practice in digital realms.

Speaker 1: Possibilities for Composing and Constructing Spirituality in Digital Spaces
Speaker 2: Tapping Into the Divine: Prayer and/as Digital App
Speaker 3: Through a Screen Darkly: Religion in the Digital Age

  • Scott Wagar,
    Miami University
  • William FitzGerald ,
    Rutgers University Camden
  • Alissa Goudswaard,
    Purdue University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Social Media

Love, Sex, and Viral Transmissions - Using Risque Content in the Classroom

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel showcases three approaches to incorporating popular, non-traditional, and often controversial online texts as rich sites of rhetorical and literary inquiry in the composition classroom.

Speaker 1: Online Dating Sites and Teaching Ethos
Speaker 2: Digital Texts and Viral Rhetorics
Speaker 3: NSFW: the Rhetoric & Literacies of Online Pornography

  • Cate Blouke,
    University of Texas at Austin - Digital Writing and Research Lab
  • Megan Varelmann,
    University of Texas at Austin - Digital Writing and Research Lab
  • Tekla Hawkins,
    University of Texas at Austin - Digital Writing and Research Lab
Tags: Digital Spaces, Pedagogy, Social Media

Me Teacher, You Expert: The Promises and Practices of Digital Nativity

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel tests digital nativity as a pedagogical approach and attempts to find its limits as a tool for theorizing students' relationships with digital technology. As teachers at a regional state university, the panelists teach a primarily first-generation college student population that responds positively to exercises that build their confidence in writing with technology, and yet both panelists are uncomfortable with the term "digital natives" in its colonial implications, as well as its inaccurate suggestions about the assumed technological mastery of students.

  • Lars Söderlund,
    Wright State University
  • Jessica Adams,
    Wright State University
Tags: Digital Humanities, First-Year Writing Courses, Pedagogy

Pathos, Technology, and Composition

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This session argues that if as compositionists invested in writing technology we are to take seriously the recent call for multiliteracies in the composition classroom (Selfe and Hawisher; Banks; Alexander; et al.), then we necessarily need to take seriously pathos-based relationships to and literacies of technology.

Speaker 1: The Trope of Digital Inauthenticity in Popular Culture: Engaging Fear of/in Digital Composition Spaces
Speaker 2: Digital Loss, Techno Magic, and Nostalgic Re-embodiment: The Emotionally Grounding Role of Digital Craft Aesthetics
Speaker 3: Pathos and Adult Students: Personal Histories, Technology, and Multimodality  in the Composition Classroom

  • Katherine DeLuca,
    The Ohio State University
  • William Kurlinkus,
    The Ohio State University
  • Deborah Kuzawa,
    The Ohio State University
  • Cynthia Selfe,
    (Chair)
Tags: Digital Spaces, Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition

The Crossroad of Computers and Writing & Two-Year Colleges: A Speed Panel

Room: Tompkins G109 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Featured Session

Considering that the 1,100 plus community colleges that enroll a total of 12.4 million students (American Association of Community College 2011 Fast Facts), are teaching a lot of writing classes, it’s time we talk about computers and writing in the two-year college setting. Not only are the students enrolled in two-year colleges generally different than their four-year counterparts, the faculty are not necessarily the same either. Specifically, these panelists are extremely interested in the following questions when two-year college faculty and students get mixed up with computers and writing:

  1. How are faculty, learning support staff, and students prepared for teaching and learning (multimodal) writing and/or in online courses?
  2. What access do faculty and students have to various (multimodal) composing, teaching, and learning technologies?
  3. How are two-year colleges supporting both faculty and students teaching and learning (multimodal) writing and/or in online courses? 
  4. How do various external pressures, both professional and personal, impact faculty and student teaching and learning?

In this speed panel we are trying to get a variety of voices making strong statements to kick off discussion. Having prepared their answers in advance, each of our panelists will have exactly two minutes to answer each of the following two questions. They will then have exactly one minute to respond to one another and then we’ll open the session to Q&A.

  • Shelley Rodrigo,
    Old Dominion University
  • Cheri Lemieux Spiegel,
    Northern Virginia Community College
  • Amy Edwards Patterson,
    Moraine Park Technical College
  • Ruijie Zhao,
    Parkland College
  • Catrina Mitchum,
    Tidewater Community College, Kaplan University
  • Beth Bensen-Barber,
    J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College
  • Rhonda Grego,
    Midlands Technical College
  • Clint Gardner,
    Salt Lake Community College
Tags: Community College, Pedagogy

The Naming and Locating of Multimodal Texts

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Saturday Session E: 8:30-9:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel delves into the meaning behind "multimodal," exploring what the term means to scholars along with the "where" and "how" regarding the composing of multimodal texts. Through interviews, analysis of scholarship, and critical inquiry into the sites of multimodal composing, panelists argue for the most productive ways to classify multimodal texts and what their creation looks like in practice.

Speaker 1: What's in a Name?: The Anatomy of a Definining New/Multi/Modal/Digital/Media Texts
Speaker 2: Viewing Writing as a Medium in College Composition
Speaker 3: Bricks, Bits, and Pixels: Spaces for digital composing

  • Claire Lauer,
    Arizona State University
  • Matthew Halm,
    Washington State University
  • David Sheridan,
    Michigan State University
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition

Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15

Architectures of Attention: From Inner Space to Outdoors

Room: Tompkins G109 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel inquires into the rhetorical nature of attention through the framework of architecture.  This panel explores how Lanham’s definition may be mobilized through material and immaterial architectures. The panelists seek to examine the economics of attention in three disparate, but interconnected architectures: neurophysiology, the digital classroom, and augmented reality.

Speaker 1: Affective Screens: Attention in Digital Information Ecologies
Speaker 2: Attention, Technology, and the Geography of the Classroom
Speaker 3: Ghosts of South Carolina College: Attention and Memory in Augmented Reality

  • Christian Damon Smith ,
    University of South Carolina
  • Matthew Simmons ,
    University of South Carolina
  • Grace Hagood,
    University of South Carolina
Tags: Digital Spaces, Games and Gaming, Materiality

Constructing Queer Digital Spaces: An Overview, a History, a Future

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Featured Session

In 2002, Jonathan Alexander and Will began soliciting manuscripts for the first queer-focused special issue of Computers & Composition. Despite a smattering of essays addressing queer issues and digital composition, the topic had not been addressed in any substantial way. The resulting issue, *sexualities, technologies, and the teaching of writing,* opened new avenues for scholars, highlighting the complex intersections of sex/sexuality and technologies, from issues of representation in digital environments to to the promises and possibilities for such work in the classroom. Ten years later, our field has exploded with a new generation of young queer scholars who are pushing the boundaries queer scholarship and technology studies.  In this featured session, Jonathan and Will explore this "queer turn" in computers and writing scholarship and use video interviews with emerging researchers to highlight a future for our scholarship.

  • Will Banks,
    East Carolina University
  • Jonathan Alexander,
    University of California, Irvine
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Gender, Social Action

Electronic Communication and the Expectations of the Academy: Where Do We Go from Here?

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel explores the intersection of electronic communication norms and conventions of academic discourse as well as the impact of extranoematic responsibilities. Panelists will specifically address collaborative authoring, social media, and the future of online teaching, drawing connections between cybertextuality, electronic communication, and the expectations of the Academy.

Speaker 1: “Meanwhile, in an Entirely Different Thread”: Reading 4chan as Cybertext
Speaker 2: iWrite Cool: Teaching Academic Writing through Conventions of Social Media Discourse
Speaker 3: Cracks in the Foundation or Enlarging the Space?  eCore Curriculum in Georgia

  • Vyshali Manivannan,
    Rutgers University: School of Communication and Information
  • Tiffany Elliott,
    Lincoln Land Community College
  • Marcia Bost,
    Georgia State University
Tags: Digital Humanities, Multimodal Composition, Social Media

Let’s Review: Design & Results of a Large-Scale Study of the Relationship Between Peer Review Quality and Writing Improvement

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

We examine rationales for teaching students to be good reviewers of others’ work in a writing course. One of these seems to relate to the nature and quality of review activity: review activity helps writers make otherwise tacit knowledge about writing more explicit, and so we would expect to see students who engage in review to improve as writers.

  • Jeff Grabil,
    Michigan State University
  • Bill Hart-Davidson,
    Michigan State University
  • Michael McLeod,
    Michigan State University
Tags: Digital Humanities, Pedagogy, Research and Methodology

Scaffolding learning across multiple environments

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Successfully scaffolding learning both within the university and beyond remains a challenge for educators and mentors. This panel presents the results of several studies exploring how learning is structured and sustained in a variety of contexts.

Speaker 1: Mentorship and Composing: The When of Digital and Local Infrastructures
Speaker 2: Context-Switching or Meshing?: Designing Digital Texts in/for the Classroom
Speaker 3: Undergraduates’ Temporary Technology Adoption of Software Applications in FYC and Gen Ed Digital Media Courses

  • Don Unger,
    Purdue University
  • Sarah Spring,
    Winthrop University
  • Genevieve Critel,
    Ohio State University
Tags: Infrastructure, Mentoring, Multimodal Composition

Screencasting in Research and Teaching: New Methods of Study in New Media

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel outlines new methods for researching with online data, and for teaching with screencasting software. We highlight methods for analyzing the circulations of text in social networks; outline screencasting news websites for data collection; assess the utility of screencasting methods in classrooms to enhance peer-to-peer feedback.

Speaker 1: Disappearing online data?: Screen capture as a research method
Speaker 2: Camtasia in the Classroom: A Comparative Study of Students Providing Audio/Video Feedback via Camtasia and Written Feedback via Google Docs
Speaker 3: The Next Movement: Engaging Interdisciplinary Methods in the Study of New Media Texts in Circulation

  • Jennifer Ware,
    North Carolina State University
  • Mary Lourdes Silva,
    Ithaca College
  • Audra K. Roach,
    University of Texas at Austin
Tags: Digital Humanities, Research and Methodology

The ArchiTEXTure of Praxis: Context, Brain, and Technologies in the Writing Classroom

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Increasingly, writing and new media construction have become “radically distributed” acts. With this in mind, this panel discusses the need for instructors to take a closer look at the “situated cognition” of students in helping them understand knowledge economies, the architecture of the brain and strategy retention, and the affordances of peer-to-peer technologies.

Speaker 1: Using the Economics of Information to Help Students Understand Digital Texts and Digital Information Spaces
Speaker 2: Architexture of the Mind: The Exigency of Cognitive Perspectives in the New Media Classroom
Speaker 3: Inventing knowledge through peer-to-peer technologies:  shared knowledge structures

  • Kim Duckett,
    North Carolina State University
  • Daun Daemon,
    North Carolina State University
  • Christopher Dickman,
    Saint Louis University
  • Thomas Skeen,
    Arizona State University
Tags: Collaboration, Digital Scholarship, Writing Studies

The Available Means of Composing: Four Sites of Inquiry

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Presenters define the “available means of composing” through inquiry at four sites of multimodal composing: an upper-level undergraduate course in 21st Century writing, an upper-level undergraduate course that uses an approach to teaching programming as composition, a university multiliteracy center, and the site of the creation of a vernacular memorial.

  • Matt Davis,
    Florida State University
  • Kevin Brock,
    North Carolina State University
  • Stephen McElroy,
    Florida State University
  • Leigh Graziano,
    Florida State University
  • Kristin Arola (Respondent),
    Washington State University
Tags: Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition, Writing Studies

The Writing Spaces Web Writing Style Guide: Building a Commons

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: Roundtable

In this roundtable session, the presenters will start a conversation that will:

1. Reflect on how a conference/unconference commons developed this text, and on the value of an open-access text book.
2. Encourage participants to talk about how they are using the WWSG in the classroom.
3. Consider the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different formats through which WWSG is published: HTML, PDF, and EPUB.
4. Invite roundtable attendees to help plan for, and eventually participate in WWSG version 2.0, a project that will begin in July 2012.

  • Elizabeth D. Woodworth,
    Auburn University at Montgomery
  • Charles E. Lowe,
    Grand Valley State University
  • Jim Kalmbach,
    Illinois State University
  • Pavel Zemliansky,
    University of Central Florida
Tags: Collaboration, Open Source, Writing Studies

Ways of (Sonic) Being: Composing and Performing Sonic Rhetorics

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: ConstrucTEXT

We’ve designed this performance to playfully affect our shared “ways of being.” We’ll test the boundaries of the comprehensible and rhetorical, embrace and disdain musical genealogies and genres, and enact sounds (and silences) that challenge notions of musical communication. Discussion will follow as we articulate our approaches, influences, and choices.

  • Kyle D. Stedman,
    University of South Florida
  • Steven Hammer,
    North Dakota State University
  • Harley Ferris,
    University of Louisville
  • Jon Stone,
    University of Illinois
Tags: Collaboration, Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition

Why am I Who Here?: Constructing Instructor Identities in the Online Classroom

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Saturday Session F: 10:00-11:15 Session Type: CREATE!

In this CREATE! Workshop, participants will produce pedagogically-informed plans for constructing teacher identities in online courses.  They will analyze examples and engage with a range of tools for creating online instructor identity, including audio/video files, JING presentations, text-based announcement and feedback, and visual images.  We will discuss some of the reasons that instructor presence matters in online courses, as well as many of the occasions that require conscious decisions about self-presentation.  Most importantly, we will discuss some of the pedagogical reasons for using different tools for different situations. 

  • Jen Black,
    Boise State University
  • Stephanie Cox,
    Boise State University
  • Jill Heney,
    Boise State University
  • Melissa Keith,
    Boise State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Pedagogy

Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00

Assessing digital writing: Opportunities and challenges for programs and instructors

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Roundtable

Our roundtable will lead a nuanced discussion about specific opportunities and challenges related to assessing students’ digital writing for instructors and programs. The five members of our roundtable bring a variety of expertise related to the assessment of digital writing at all levels from the individual course to the program to a university-wide system that serves local students as well as those from other institutions. We will highlight the concerns raised in our local contexts and facilitate an exchange of ideas, issues, and new approaches to the assessment of digital writing.

  • Colleen Reilly,
    University of North Carolina Wilmington
  • Anthony Atkins,
    University of North Carolina Wilmington
  • Judith Fourzan-Rice ,
    University of Texas at El Paso
  • Carrie Lamanna ,
    Colorado State University
  • Crystal VanKooten ,
    University of Michigan
Tags: Digital Assessment, Multimodal Composition, Pedagogy

Basic Writers in Digital Spaces

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Basic writers in today’s classrooms are non-native speakers in digital spaces. Because they are necessary consumers of digital texts who are often less competent producers, or speakers, of the same, the increasing movement of writing and writing instruction to digital spaces presents both challenges and opportunities for their instructors. This panel presentation addresses a few of those issues via several questions raised by Marissa A. Klages and J. Elizabeth Clark in their article “New Worlds of Errors and Expectations: Basic Writers and Digital Assumptions,” which appears in The Journal of Basic Writers.

Speaker 1: How do we transform the paper and pen classroom to a digitally-saturated environment?
Speaker 2: What are the ramifications?
Speaker 3: How can we engage students so that they can navigate both digital and traditional writing?

  • Dr. Suzanne Biedenbach,
    Georgia Gwinnett College
  • Dr. Kim Davis,
    Georgia Gwinnett College
  • Dr. Tonya Ritola,
    Georgia Gwinnett College
Tags: Course Management Systems, Digital Spaces, Identity

Blueprints for Digital Composition Spaces: The Architextures of ePorfolios and Digital Video Compositions

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Three architects of compositional spaces discuss the institutional, technological, and pedagogical implications of groundbreaking curricular innovations that redefine what composition is, how it connects with others, and how digital compositions and learning records can be assessed.

Speaker 1: Walking the Tightrope: Institutional, Pedagogical, and Technological Challenges in Electronic Portfolio Development
Speaker 2: Nine Years of Successes and Challenges: A Report on NIU's First-Year Composition Electronic Portfolio Project
Speaker 3: Racking Focus on Digital Video Compositions: Student Perspectives and Pedagogical Implications

  • Quinn Warnick,
    St. Edward's University
  • Michael Day,
    Northern Illinois University
  • Scott Kowalewski,
    Virginia Tech
Tags: Course Management Systems, Digital Assessment, Open Source

ePortfolios and Material Practices in Writing Program Assessment

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation
  • Christy Desmet,
    University of Georgia
  • Ron Balthazor,
    University of Georgia
  • Deborah Church Miller,
    University of Georgia
Tags: Digital Assessment, Materiality, Multimodal Composition

Innovation, Resistance, and Student Motivation: Challenging Existing Pedagogy with Gamification and Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Design

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel explores how new media tools inspire innovative spaces for learning while challenging institutional standards. Presenters discuss using video game point systems to motivate first-year composition students, designing a tabletop RPG to demonstrate writing and graphic arts concepts, and adapting MOOC pedagogies to spark creativity in advanced college writers.

  • Megan McKittrick,
    Old Dominion University
  • Cheryl Smith,
    Baruch College, City University of New York
  • David Bradley Bailey and Hilton Neeld,
    Golden Isles Career Academy and Altamaha Technical College
Tags: Community College, First-Year Writing Courses, Games and Gaming

Lost Online: Classroom Websites and Distance Education

Room: Tompkins G109 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Student apathy and engagement with online class material are a perennial problem. This panel offers suggestions for course design, reading student evaluations, and creating spaces to encourage interaction on class websites.

Speaker 1: “Here we are now, <strike>entertain</strike> educate us”: Course websites and a redefinition of student apathy
Speaker 2: “I don’t want to feel as though I’m hiding” - Iterations of Student Identity in Ubiquitous Computing Environments and Hybrid Classrooms
Speaker 3: Assessing Online Writing Course Student Evaluation Methods and Response Rates

  • Daniel Richards,
    University of South Florida
  • Stephanie Hedge,
    Ball State University
  • Jennifer Stewart,
    Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne
Tags: Digital Spaces, Pedagogy, Social Action

New Media, New Writing

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

New Media, and social media in particular, offer new sites for learning, literacy sponsorship, and writing. The panelists in this session explore how these outlets are being used both within the classroom and by outside organizations, to support and invigorate learning and literacy practices.

Speaker 1: Integrating Social Media into Online Educational Spaces: Modeling Professional Practice in Instructional Interactions
Speaker 2: Positioning Literacy Sponsorship in New Media
Speaker 3: Policy and User-Generated Content: Uncovering User Experience Challenges for Technical Communicators Studying the Social Web

  • Brad Mehlenbacher,
    Leadership, Policy and Adult & Higher Education. North Carolina State University
  • Ashley R. Kelly,
    Communication, Rhetoric, & Digital Media. North Carolina State University
  • Patrick Thomas,
    University of Dayton
  • Dave Jones,
    Old Dominion University
Tags: Collaboration, Pedagogy, Social Media

Reveling in the Conjoining of the Sensible and the Digital: Art Practices of Technology and Human

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Featured Session

This panel will feature the two invited artists, Thomas T. Stanley and Tesia Kosmalski, speaking about their work and art practices. The artists will present their work within a political and theoretical context and, afterward, open up to questions and inquiries about art, practice, and theory.

Chair: Seth Muliken
Thomas T. Stanley: “Ghostdance Generation: Musical Responsibility in Periapocalyptic Times”
Tesia Kosmalski: “Wearable, projective sound as a tool of textual intervention for today’s flaneuse.”

Tags:

Shaping TEXTure(s): Memory, Identity, and Pedagogy

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

As Loftin (2003) explains, through “...sensory inputs--visual, auditory, haptic (pressure, texture, and temperature), olfactory, gustatory, and vestibular...we live our lives immersed in a multisensory world...” (p. 56). These archiTEXTures of perception are tools that enable composing and constructing in digital spaces. This panel explores theoretical and practical considerations students must navigate in the process of composing, concluding with some pragmatic applications for reshaping writing pedagogies.

Speaker 1: DigiTEXTuring Memories and Gaslighting
Speaker 2: Digital Geographies: The archiTEXTure of Space, Place, and Identity
Speaker 3: Digital Classrooms: The reTEXTure of Writing Pedagogy

  • Paul Muhlhauser,
    Washington State University, Tri-Cities
  • Andréa D. Davis,
    Washington State University, Tri-Cities
  • Vanessa Cozza,
    Washington State University, Tri-Cities
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Pedagogy

Textual Relations, Digital Creations: Readers, Writers, Players, Texts

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Saturday Session G: 2:45-4:00 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel explores the multiple layers and connections of audience-text relations in digital spaces, where shifting readerly and writerly positions and interests complicate composing and meaning-making, as well as some of the familiar logics and ecologies of the composition classroom.

Speaker 1: Toward a More Comprehensive Theory of Audience: The Hypersocial-Interactive Model of Writing
Speaker 2: Same Audience, Same Argument, Different Form? Exploring the Rhetorical Affordances of Genre and Medium
Speaker 3: "Player 2": Mixing Gameplay and Audience Heuristics
Speaker 4: Stomp Box Logic: Toward a Language of Loops, Feedback, and Layers

  • Rik Hunter,
    St. John Fisher College
  • Naomi Silver,
    University of Michigan
  • Scott Reed,
    Georgia Gwinnett College
  • Byron Hawk,
    University of South Carolina
Tags: Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition, Pedagogy

Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30

ArchiTEXTures that reInvent: Thought, Self, and Other

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel examines spaces of learning and communication that explore and expand existing theories of rhetoric and composition pedagogy, exploring new textures such as audio, voice, and social media discourse.

Speaker 1: ReHearing & ReSpeaking Voice as a Productive Concept for Composition Studies
Speaker 2: Only (Re) Connect: Unpacking disconnection through Audio Collages
Speaker 3: (Re)Defining What Counts: Embracing Incomplete Critical and Digital Thought in Basic Writing

  • Jennifer Buckner,
    Gardner-Webb University
  • Abby Nance,
    Gardner-Webb University
  • Shana Hartman,
    Gardner-Webb University
Tags: Collaboration, Identity, Multimodal Composition

Beyond Retrofitting: Unlearning Composition in Digital Times

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

The future of rhetoric and composition—and of our own computers and writing— require that we not only learn new skills of composing, but that we also unlearn old epistemologies. This panel identifies processes of unlearning that occur (or in some cases, should occur) in the teaching and manufacturing of digital and multimodal texts.

Speaker 1: Unlearning Accommodation: Universal Design and Multimodal Pedagogies
Speaker 2: Unlearning Publishing: Consolidation and Expertise in the Digital Age
Speaker 3: Unlearning Old Age: What Can Older Adults Teach Us About Digital Literacies?

  • Allison Harper Hitt,
    Syracuse University
  • Patrick W. Berry,
    Syracuse University
  • Lauren Marshall Bowen,
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Tags: Accessibility, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

Constructing Identity in Web 2.0 Spaces: Understanding the Possibilities and Constraints

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

By examining the relationships between authors, audience, and content in various digital mediums and experiences, this panel discusses what it means to have a digital identity as well as examine any ethical, social, or relationship questions and paradigms across various interactive mediums.

  • Craig Olsen,
    Bowling Green State University
  • Megan Adams,
    Bowling Green State University
  • Estee Beck,
    Bowling Green State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Social Media

Defining Identity in Online Space: Problems and Provocations

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Online spaces redefine the notion of public and private spheres and the relationship between space, body, and self. The hybridity enabled by the spaces presents both provocative spaces to explore identity and problematizes the identity of those unable to speak for themselves. This panel explores how various groups of users construct, or are constructed by, their online identity.

Speaker 1: A Shift in the Construction of Self: What new social media practice means for people whose digital identities are created for them
Speaker 2: Online Voices: Reconstructing One’s Own Map Using Online Illness Narratives
Speaker 3: Redefining Space, Body, and Self in the Secular and Islamic Feminist Rhetorics of Muslim Women’s Cyber Spaces

  • Sarah Brown,
    DePaul University
  • Calley O'Neil,
    DePaul University
  • Rebecca Miner,
    Michigan Technological University
  • Samaa Gamie,
    Lincoln University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Social Media

Digital Composing/Resisting Possibilities in Public Schools

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Roundtable

The NC Writing Project sites have resisted the restrictive nature of digital composing in K-12 classrooms by inviting teachers and students to become digital composers and to resist the limited vision of technology that they work within. This panel explores the breakthroughs that happened when teachers work in collaboration to make digital composing available to students. 

  • Lil Brannon,
    UNC Charlotte Writing Project, UNC Charlotte
  • Will Banks,
    Tar River Writing Project, East Carolina University
  • Cindy Urbanski,
    UNC Charlotte Writing Project, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
  • Stephanie West-Puckett,
    Tar River Writing Project, East Carolina University
  • Lacy Manship,
    UNC Charlotte Writing Project, Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools
  • Rob Puckett,
    Tar River Writing Project, Rose High Schoo
  • Steve Fulton,
    UNC Charlotte Writing Project, Kannapolis City Schools
Tags: Pedagogy, Social Action

Digitizing the Genre of Course Documents and Assessments

Room: Tompkins G109 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel examines the new affordances that digital media provide when building course documents and how digitizing these documents calls for a new interpretation of their genre. Panelists explore how to better design student reflections that focus on their writing process rather than a self-assessment, and explore how the genre of course documents evolves within the space of digital media.

Speaker 1: The Awful Exigency: Becoming ArchiTEXTs of Our Own Design
Speaker 2: It’s a Road Map:  Instructors Use of the Spatial in the Design & Delivery of Course Documents

  • Jonathan Bradshaw,
    Miami University of Ohio
  • Erin Pastore,
    Old Dominion University
Tags: First-Year Writing Courses, Multimodal Composition, Writing Studies

Multimodal Place: Soundwriting, Transcripts, and Transmedia

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel focuses on sound, transcript, and virtual world as means of interacting with place. The presentations discuss multimodal interfaces in which audio voice recordings are combined with images, music, and full transcripts of those recordings. Audio and transcript not only make verbal content more accessible, these multiple access points collapse the binary between physical and virtual places and take fuller advantage of the range of human perception.

Speaker 1: Multimodal California
Speaker 2: Composition, (Click!), Magic: Soundwriting Place On The Fly
Speaker 3: Podcasts in and around the Bay: Soundseeing Place and Multiscreening Text

  • Terry Beers,
    Santa Clara University
  • Will Burdette,
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Olin Bjork,
    Santa Clara University
  • Bernhard Drax,
    Non-Academic Transmedia Producer
Tags: Digital Spaces, Multimodal Composition

Technology Effects/Writing Effects: Materiality, Consequentiality, and Mobility

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel presentation considers theoretical, methodological, and productive intersections between materiality and technology, particularly within the context of digital writing writ large, as well as their ethical implications.

Speaker 1: The Technology Effect
Speaker 2: The Materiality Effect
Speaker 3: The Augmented Reality Effect
Speaker 4: The Old New Media Effect

  • Sid Dobrin,
    University of Florida
  • Laurie Gries,
    University of Florida
  • John Tinnell,
    University of Florida
  • Caroline Stone,
    University of Florida
Tags: Materiality, Visual Studies, Writing Studies

The Shape of Digital Scholars(hip)

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel questions the design of digital spaces for shaping, exploring, and questioning meaning as it resonates in digital scholarship and for digital scholars. Focusing both upon how gaming and gaming scholarship explores the design of digital spaces as well as how multimodal installations are increasingly present at conventional academic venues, our panel contemplates evolving dimensions of emergent digital scholarship in ways that promote critical inquiry, pedagogy, and pleasure. We are especially unified in our concerns for how digital spaces shape perception, identity, and new forms of rhetorical identification.

Speaker 1: bonnie lenore kyburz. on "screencube." kyburz reflects upon the emergence of a clearer sense of scholarly self as it happens within digital scholarship. Tracing experiences in unintentional scholarly status, kyburz considers extra-curricular identities as they merge with promising digital scholarly forums (C & W, Enculturation, Kairos) in ways that suggest a kind of academic “identity fidelity.” Referencing her long (tragic! thrilling! tantalizing!) experience, Burkean identification, Deleuzean emergence and time-movement concepts, and Kathleen Fitzpatrick's work on humanities publishing, post-digital turn, kyburz contextualizes her hopefully telling evolution by sharing “findings” from her first multimodal installation, “screencube,” which was displayed at the 2102 MLA session, “MoMLA: From Panel to Gallery.” kyburz will share video, interviews, and “confessional texts” from viewers, as she considers the new shape(s) of digital scholarship and performance.

Speaker 2: Pamela Andrews. Performing Reader Response Theory through Virtual Playworlds. Andrews argues that the use of virtual spaces allows readers to perform reader-response theories by creating virtual representations of the text and creating self-representations to populate it. One online forum-based role playing community, Absit Omen, creates an experimental site in which readers can create self-representations, or simulacra, to populate and interact with the text. The simulacra translate the written text of the Harry Potter series authored by J.K. Rowling into a rhetoric of performance wherein the mind and body, previously separated in classical rhetoric as argued by Jay Dolmage, are reunited to create a living text. By looking at the ratios of the pentad involved with the creation of the simulacra and the simulacra’s own performance of the text within the virtual space, she will present a framework for understanding the relationship between the reader and the text as mediated by virtual playworlds.

Speaker 3: Elizabeth Kuechenmeister. Perception = Reality:  The Rhetoric of Game Design in echochrome. Elizabeth Kuechenmeister focuses on the rhetoric of composing in the digital space of the PS3 puzzle game echochrome. She argues that the process of user-created level design is a form of embodied rhetoric and that echochrome, in particular, demonstrates how video games complicate the notion of audience as active in meaning-making because (in part) of how audience/player perception determines truth.

  • bonnie lenore kyburz,
    utah valley university
  • Pamela Andrews,
    University of Central Florida
  • Elizabeth Fleitz Kuechenmeister,
    Bowling Green State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Infrastructure

The “New” Future of Auditory Rhetoric(s): Sound and Silence “Scene” Through Productive Difference

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Featured Session

Since the 2006 special issue in Computers in Composition posed questions on “Sound in/as Composition Space” and the publication of Cynthia Selfe’s (2009) call to action piece, “The Movement of Air, the Breath of Meaning: Aurality and Multimodal Composing,”composition and rhetoric scholars have begun to question our investment in the study of sound. These articles opened up some of the following possibilities: sound as auditory rhetoric, sound as a compositional material, sound as a tool or epistemology, and sound as both a historical and phenomenological reality--a part of all our available means of persuasion. What this featured session seeks to address is the “new” future for the study and teaching of auditory rhetoric. This is both a question of what we have learned as a field and how we might continue to “move forward.” What objects or genres of sound are particularly appropriate to the composition classroom? Does auditory rhetoric occasion the study of all sensory rhetorics separately, or are there ways to integrate these rhetorics? How are “scenic sounds” and spaces rhetorically constructed? How do we negotiate rhetorical responsiveness to sound and silence in the human voice?

Speaker 1: Composing Sound Assignments: Modality, Genre, Difference
Speaker 2: Tuning and Timing for the Rhetoric(s) of Sound
Speaker 3: Hearing to be Scene: Landscaping the Superfield of Audio-Visual Writing
Speaker 4: Sound, Silence, and Rhetorical Responsiveness

  • Genevieve Critel,
    Ohio State University
  • Kati Fargo Ahern,
    North Carolina State University
  • Bump Halbritter,
    Michigan State University
  • Cynthia Selfe,
    Ohio State University
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

Theorizing a new term for multi-media engagement: readers, constructors, players

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Saturday Session H: 4:15-5:30 Session Type: Panel Presentation

In this panel, two undergraduate students and their professor examine what term—rather than, say, reader or writer—might best encapsulate the complex rhetorical work of engaging and constructing computer-based media. Conclusions shared came out of discussions in an upper-level composition course focused on written language in a digital era.

  • Laura Aull,
    Assistant Professor of English, Wake Forest University
  • Tommy Murcko,
    student, Wake Forest University
  • Josh Courtney,
    student, Wake Forest University
Tags: Digital Scholarship, Pedagogy, Writing Studies

Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15

Chasing Change: Working in Composition, Evolving Writing Technologies, and Our Quiet Mandate

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Student writers must be able to understand, engage, and perform a kind of “fluid and flexible sense of correctness,” which means writing instructors have to be continually mindful of the relationship between Composition Studies, writing technologies, and the quiet yet perceived mandate to ‘keep up,’ or chase change. This panel focuses on problems and possibilities that derive directly from such a relationship. 

  • Patti Problete ,
    Purdue
  • Alex Layne,
    Purdue
  • Jeremy Cushman,
    Purdue
  • Patricia Sullivan ,
    Purdue
Tags: Humanities Computing, Infrastructure, Materiality

Constructing Classroom ArchiTEXTures: Dissonance, Barriers, Curation, and the Spirit of Human

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel examines several archiTEXTures that frame composing and the teaching of composing [beyond] texts. It asks in which ways ours and our students’ interactions, experiences, engagement, and resistance remediate the design and curation of cultural texts and digital spaces.

Speaker #1 Architexts, Social, Media, Culture, and the Spirit of Human
Speaker #2: We Are(n’t) Living in a Material World: Curating Texts on Pinterest
Speaker #3: Cultural Dissonance and “Sameness”: Intercultural Websites in an Introductory Technical Writing Class

  • Jim Kalmbach (chair),
    Illinois State University
  • Deborah Balzhiser,
    Texas State University
  • Devon Fitzgerald Ralston,
    Millikin University
  • Kyle Mattson,
    University of Central Arkansas
Tags: Digital Spaces, Pedagogy, Social Media

Digital Literacies in FYC Classrooms: Enhancing Understanding, Engagement, and Transfer

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Recent developments in transfer studies from first-year composition have considered the contextual implications of transfer, where the transfer of writing-related knowledge is viewed as dependent on FYC instructors, students, and classroom environments. Taking these contextual implications into account, we suggest that introducing digital literacies into the writing classroom as a way of helping students operationalize rhetorical concepts can help instructors bridge the gap between the writing that students do in the classroom and the writing that they will produce in future contexts.

  • Laura Martinez,
    University of Central Florida
  • Chris Friend,
    University of Central Florida
  • Leslie Wolcott,
    University of Central Florida
Tags: First-Year Writing Courses, Social Media

Hacking the Classroom: A Roundtable of Lightning Talks

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: Roundtable

With hacking in mind, these panelists (who hail from disparate institutions, levels, and disciplines) will briefly engage the following questions: “Why does the higher ed classroom need to be hacked, and how might we hack it?” They will also provide particular examples of their own hacking practices, or their aspirations to hack the classroom at their respective institutions, while addressing some obstacles, enthusiasms, and curiosities encountered along the way.

  • Virginia Kuhn,
    USC
  • Jim Brown,
    UW-Madison
  • Liz Losh,
    UCSD
  • Vicki Callahan,
    UW-Milwaukee
  • Mary Hocks,
    Georgia State
  • Aimee Knight ,
    St. Joseph's
  • Melanie Yergeau,
    University of Michigan
  • Craig Dietrich,
    USC
  • Viola Lasmana,
    USC
  • Jentery Sayers MODERATOR,
    University of Victoria
Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarships, Multiliteracies

Moving Beyond Print: Connecting to Basic Writers through Digital Pedagogy

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel argues that digital applications in basic writing classrooms validate and authenticate basic writers’ writing experiences by broadening the perimeters of academic writing while teaching writers standard prose that reinforces the marriage between personal experience and its affect on writing.

  • Lynn Reid,
    Fairleigh Dickinson University/ Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  • Amy Edwards Patterson,
    Moraine Park Technical College
  • Rasheda Young,
    Brookdale Community College
Tags: Community College, Digital Assessment, Pedagogy

My Name is YouTube and I Expose Your Secrets: ConstrucTEXTING the Underbelly of Video Cultures

Room: Tompkins 112 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: ConstrucTEXT

This panel will examine videos related to the tragic and lasting exemplars of online video culture that are indicative of the phenomenon of exposure, a phenomenon easily grasped by considering the story of Tyler Clementi, a Rutgers student who committed suicide in 2010 after his roommate broadcasted a video of him having sex on YouTube.

Speaker 1: My Name is Alexandra Wallace. I Got Called Out for My Anti-Asian Rant at UCLA
Speaker 2: My Name is Tyler Clementi. I Jumped off the George Washington Bridge Because of a Video
Speaker 3: My Name is Evan Emory. My Classroom Video Turned into a Felony Sex Charge
Speaker 4: My Name is Donald Wood. My Rage at My High School Class was Posted on YouTube

  • Sarah J. Arroyo,
    California State University at Long Beach
  • Robert Leston,
    New York City College of Technology
  • Sherrin Francis,
    Saginaw Valley State University
  • Geoffrey V. Carter,
    Saginaw Valley State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Social Media

Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: Featured Session

Chairs: Josh Reeves and Jeff Swift

Panelists: Susan Miller-Cochran, William Hart-Davidson, Cynthia Haynes

This special session will facilitate dialogue about the state and direction of interdisciplinary graduate studies in rhetoric. Panelists will give brief introductory remarks, with the rest of the session devoted to open discussion. We therefore encourage students and faculty to attend and participate what will surely be a lively conversation about the changing landscape of our field. While we look forward to the discussion taking off in unexpected directions, we have asked participants to think about (1) the foremost challenges and opportunities facing rhetoric PhD programs; (2) the most valuable resources that an (or your) interdisciplinary rhetoric program can offer; and (3) what the future of rhetoric programs should look like.

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Reading, Writing, and Reconceiving Digital Comics

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Comics, graphic novels, or “juxtaposed words and images in deliberate sequence.”  Whatever you call them, new media create new spaces for the composition, circulation, and discussion of these imagetexts. In this panel, we explore the meaning-making practices of comics in digital environments: as classroom texts, interfaces, and digitally native artifacts.

Speaker 1: Analyzing Comics with Comics: First-Year Writers Meet Bitstrips
Speaker 2: From Panels to Pixels: Digital Comics in the Wild
Speaker 3: “Scribbly Lines and Peripheral Foreshadowing: What a Comics Page Can Teach Us About Composing Interfaces”

  • Rachael Sullivan,
    UW-Milwaukee
  • Franny Howes,
    Virginia Tech
  • Fred Johnson ,
    Whitworth University
Tags: Digital Spaces, First-Year Writing Courses, Multimodal Composition

The Materiality of Digital Scholarship: Video, Poetry, Found Objects

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel explores various modes of expressive media from a rhetorically situated perspective. Panelists engage these media to examine their persuasive basis concerning both lived experience and culturally-positioned rhetorical arguments. Moreover, the process of construction of these media is explored as an equally important facet within the broader context.

Speaker 1: Five Virtual Canons: Time-based Media as a New(ish) Site for Rhetoric (revised version)
Speaker 2: The Dream of a Common Silence: Poetry Beyond Print Culture
Speaker 3: To preserve, digitize and project:  On the process of composing other people’s lives

  • Keith Dorwick,
    The University of Louisiana at Lafayette
  • David Webber,
    The Universit of Louisiana at Lafayette
  • Julie Platt,
    Michigan State University
  • Jody Shipka,
    University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Tags: Digital Spaces, Mentoring, Visual Studies

To Wix or Not to Wix: Exploring the Interface and the Affordances of Wix.com’s Website Creator

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Sunday Session I: 9:00-10:15 Session Type: CREATE!

This CREATE! session will explore one of the more current and thriving freeware website creators, Wix (www.wix.com), which offers its users free online hosting space as well as a wide spectrum of design options.  Unlike other website creators, Wix provides its users varying degrees of design agency:  Wix members can do everything from simply copying and pasting sample templates to designing and molding frames and layouts in blank WYSIWYG and HTML coding formats.  The versatility and accessibility of the Wix website creator lends itself well to a wide variety of pedagogical use.  This workshop will expose its participants to those affordances and thus Wix’s pedagogical potential.

  • Natalie Szymanski,
    Florida State University
  • Rory Lee,
    Florida State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, First-Year Writing Courses, Multimodal Composition

Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45

Brain/Position/Play - Strategies for the Next Generation of Pedagogy

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel discusses methodologies that engage students with the personal, cognitive, and active pedagogies demanded in the 21st century, digitized writing classroom.  Through discussion of experience, strategy, and research, we seek to cover a series of methods, that, as whole, can better effect knowledge and strategy retention.

Speaker 1: Made for the Brain: Cognitive, Multimodal Instructional Materials for the First-Year Writing Classroom
Speaker 2: Find Your Position: Using Online Applications to Demonstrate Writing Processes

  • Christopher Dickman,
    Saint Louis University
  • Mikkilynn Olmsted,
    Metropolitan State College of Denver
  • Alex McDaniel,
    Metropolitan State College of Denver
  • Jane Chapman Vigil,
    Metropolitan State College of Denver
Tags: First-Year Writing Courses, Multimodal Composition, Pedagogy

Breaking Down the Canon Wall: Curating Digital Texts to Create Custom, Multi-modal Anthologies

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: CREATE!

**Please Bring your own Laptop or other Internet-enabled device to follow along and develop your own Digital Anthology**

During this Create! session, I will run a tutorial introducing participants to and developing a two-tiered social bookmarking system that will produce an interactive, multi-modal Digital Anthology.

Participants will leave the session with their own personal (and customizable) Digital Anthology, techniques to find and curate Online information (including full texts, free eBooks, audio/video, and supplementary materials), using a free MindMeister and Google Account. 

  • Adam Heidebrink,
    Washington State University, Pullman
Tags: Digital Spaces, Multimodal Composition, Pedagogy

Constructing Identities Online: Mommies, Mates, and Mourners

Room: Tompkins G109 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Featured Session

New media texts allow users to embody (Lister, et al.) future roles by “putting on” linguistic and visual commonplaces related to identity performances. Testing this claim, our presentations will examine how different forms of new media allow users to construct identities and foster interaction.

Speaker 1: Writing Ourselves into Parenthood: Understanding Social and Technological Rhetorical Conventions in Online Adoption Profiles
Speaker 2: A Rhetorician’s Guide to Love: Constructing Lovers on Match.com
Speaker 3: Commemoration in 140 Characters: How Twitter has Remediated How We Remember

  • Jennifer Sheppard,
    New Mexico State University
  • Kathryn Valentine,
    New Mexico State University
  • Jen Almjeld,
    New Mexico State University
  • Meg McGuire,
    New Mexico State University
Tags: Digital Spaces, Identity, Multimodal Composition

Controversy and Composition: A Discussion of Writing in a Technologically Mediated World

Room: Tompkins G123 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

As the millennial generation moves into the university, questions concerning the effects of technology on composition become more and more pressing. This panel will discuss the ramifications of computing and writing in a technologically mediated world, including the human cost of composition, the digitization of texts, and online course pedagogy.

 
Speaker 1: The Google Books Debate and its Implications on Teaching and Scholarship
Speaker 2: Deconstructing an Ill-Constructed Online Course
 
  • Molly Hartzog Storment,
    North Carolina State University
  • Kristopher Miller,
    Missouri Western State University
Tags: Digital Humanities, Humanities Computing, Infrastructure

Embracing the Messiness of Digital Praxis: Rhetoric, Efficiency, and Administrative Decisions about Digital Design and Online Writing Instruction

Room: Tompkins G112 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

To study the decisions made for writing courses, we propose using the concepts Efficient Rhetoric and the Rhetoric of Efficiency to understand the commonplaces that support certain ideologies over others.

Introduction: Rhetoric and Efficiency
Speaker 1: Can You Teach Me Now? The In/Efficiencies of Online Writing Instruction
Speaker 2: My Tower is Leaning: The Perils an Inefficient Pedagogy of Digital Design

  • Julia Romberger,
    Old Dominion University
  • Kevin DePew,
    Old Dominion University
Tags: Multimodal Composition, Writing Program Administration, Writing Studies

How to talk about DITA in the writing classroom (without being super rich or super geeky)

Room: Caldwell G107 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Speakers on this panel will discuss how the ever-changing digital landscape must be reflected in the tools we use in our teaching, scholarship, and production practices. Speakers will address teaching DITA in a writing classroom, extending scholarship through social media, and the need for an open paradigm for digital production.

  • Carlos Evia,
    Virginia Tech
  • Matt Sharp,
    Virginia Tech
  • Karl Stolley,
    Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Joyce P. Johnston,
    George Mason University
Tags: Digital Humanities, Digital Spaces, Multiliteracies

Putting Our Multimedia Where Our Mouth Is: The Architexture of a New MA Concentration

Room: Tompkins G118 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Panel title: Building New Architextures: Three Approaches to Institutional Realization of the Digital Turn

Panel abstract: By explaining initiatives from three distinct institutional sites—the English MA, the university writing center, and the HBCU—these panelists share approaches to creating curricular, physical, and online spaces that support digital multimodal composing. Taken together, they argue a necessary step to enacting institutional change is architextual innovation.

Speaker 1: Putting Our Multimedia Where Our Mouth Is: The Architexture of a New MA Concentration
Speaker 2: Social Future, Social Center:  Constructing a Multiliteracy Center Within a University Learning Commons
Speaker 3: Under Construction: HBCUsOnline.com and the Future Implications of the Historically Black Institutio

  • James P. Purdy,
    Duquesne University
  • Justin Young,
    Eastern Washington University
  • Kendra L. Mitchell,
    Florida State University
Tags: Collaboration, Digital Humanities, Writing Studies

The TEXTures of Digital First Year Writing

Room: Caldwell G106 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

In this panel, each presentation will discuss a moment within first year writing process that is complemented with the use of interactive technology. Even though these technologies literally increase the amount of text via writing spaces on message boards and other communications, each presentation emphasizes that the use of digital spaces aid in the creation new textual, writerly identities.

  • Gina Burkart,
    Saginaw Valley State University
  • Kim Lacey,
    Saginaw Valley State University
  • Emily J. Beard,
    Saginaw Valley State University
Tags: Collaboration, Digital Spaces, First-Year Writing Courses

Unbuilding ArchiTEXTured Boundaries: Five Transversals to The Work of Gregory Ulmer

Room: Caldwell G109 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

Speaker 1: MEmorial ArchiTEXTure
Speaker 2: TRANSVERSAL MAPPING: MONUMENTALITY IN CYBERSPACE
Speaker 3: Consulting the Emeragency on Behalf of Architecture
Speaker 4: Video Games as Heuretic Generators
Speaker 5: Steampunk Electracy and Machine Rhetorics

  • Sean Morey,
    Clemson University
  • Pearce Durst,
    Washington State University
  • Lauren Mitchell,
    Clemson University
  • Steven Keoni Holmes,
    Clemson University
  • Jan R. Holmevik,
    Clemson University
Tags: Games and Gaming, Infrastructure, Multimodal Composition

Web Development as Intervention in ArchiTEXTural Systems: Social Software for Enhanced User Empowerment, Collaboration, and Cultural/Critical Inquiry

Room: Caldwell G111 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

We argue that the changing digital landscape presents an opportunity for computers and writing scholars, as well as technical communicators, to intervene in existing systems by contributing to the development of social software that allows for enhanced user empowerment, collaboration, and cultural/critical inquiry.

Speakers 1&2: Baked Potato: Supporting User Differences in the US Food System
Speaker 2: DHShare: Facilitating Student Research Differently in the Digital Age
Speaker 3: The CDA App: Conceptualizing a Digital/Cultural Intervention in Critical Research Practices

  • William Hart-Davidson - Chair,
    Michigan State University
  • Donnie Sackey,
    Michigan State University
  • Noah Ullmann,
    Rutgers University
  • Jennifer Sano-Franchini,
    Michigan State University
  • Lehua Ledbetter,
    Michigan State University
Tags: Digital Humanities, Research and Methodology, Social Media

Writing of the Body: Digital Tools and the Transformation of Hegemonic Spaces

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Sunday Session J: 10:30-11:45 Session Type: Panel Presentation

This panel will focus on how the relationship between marginalized groups and media in the past as well as in the present can both construct and constrain identities and language. 

Speaker 1: Women, Font, and the Battle for Clarity
Speaker 2: Writing Our Way(s): (Re)Negotiating Native American Identities Through/With Technology
Speaker 3: Beyond Word: Spelling and Grammar Technologies in Networked Environments

  • Ashley Watson,
    Purdue Univeristy
  • Emily Legg,
    Purdue University
  • Gracemarie Mike,
    Purdue University
Tags: Gender, Identity, Race

Session Time: Thursday Full-Day Workshop: 9:00am-4:00pm

"Writing Virtual Worlds in the Inform Programming Language"

Room: 1911 Building Rm 110 Session Time: Thursday Full-Day Workshop: 9:00am-4:00pm Session Type: Half-Day Workshop

For educators who are interested in both computers and writing, interactive fiction games (aka text adventures) offer exciting possibilities. This workshop introduces the interactive fiction programming language Inform, which uses a syntax that resembles ordinary English.

  • Dennis G. Jerz,
    Seton Hill University
  • Shaun Martin,
    North Carolina State University
Tags: Code Studies, Digital Spaces, Games and Gaming

Lost & Found in the Wonderland of Mobile Learning


Room: Tompkins G121 Session Time: Thursday Full-Day Workshop: 9:00am-4:00pm Session Type: Full-Day Workshop
  • Rochelle Rodrigo,
    Old Dominion University
  • Catrina Mitchum,
    Old Dominion University
  • Beth Bensen-Barber,
    J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College & Old Dominion University
  • Jennifer Buckner,
    Old Dominion University
  • Cheri Lemieux Spiegel,
    Northern Virginia Community College & Old Dominion University
  • Kristopher Purzycki,
    Old Dominion University
  • Sarah Spangler,
    Old Dominion University
Tags: Multimodal Composition, Pedagogy, Social Media

Workshop: End-to-End Agile Web Application Development from Basically Nothing

Room: Tompkins 129 Session Time: Thursday Full-Day Workshop: 9:00am-4:00pm Session Type: Full-Day Workshop

This day-long workshop will introduce participants to web application development using a powerful but approachable framework (Node.js) and an agile workflow based on a version control system (Git). In addition to those back-end concerns, the workshop will also look at agile, responsive methods for front-end, user interface design.

  • Karl Stolley,
    Illinois Institute of Technology
Tags: Collaboration, Course Management Systems, Open Source

Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop A: 9:00am-12:00pm

Composing and Publishing Digitial Scholarship

Room: Tompkins 123 Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop A: 9:00am-12:00pm Session Type: Half-Day Workshop

This half-day workshop will guide and encourage authors interested in composing digital scholarship for online journals and presses. Editors from _Enculturation_, _Kairos_, and _Technoculture_ will discuss authoring processes from the beginning of research projects to the publication stage, including visualizing, storyboarding/prototyping, creating sustainable and accessible designs, querying editors, finding local resources, submitting webtexts, and revising in-progress work. Authors interested in starting (or finishing) any kind of digital scholarly project will benefit from this workshop.

Schedule of Activities:
9:00  -   9:30 Introductions and overview of the journals represented at the workshop
9:30  - 10:30 Interactive Q&A with all editors -- topics include
     (a) reading the journal's website for info
     (b) queries to the editor (how much info to include & which section/editor, if pertinent, to consider)
     (c) generalities of peer-review process
     (d) rhetorical design tips / best practices
     (e) accessibility, usability, code-level best practices

10:30 - 11:30 Small group work focused on participant needs (feedback on specific projects or how-to-get-started for participants who don't yet have a project in mind)

11:30 - 12:00 Wrap-up conversation; encourage participants to submit.

  • Douglas Eyman,
    Kairos
  • Kathie Gossett,
    Kairos
  • Moe Folk,
    Kairos
  • Byron Hawk,
    Enculturation
  • Jim Brown,
    Enculturation
  • Christian Smith,
    Enculturation
  • Kris Blair,
    C&C Online
  • Lanette Cadle,
    C&C Online
  • Joe Erickson,
    C&C Online
Tags: Collaboration, Digital Scholarship, Multimodal Composition

The Sights and Sounds of ArchiTEXTure: Modeling Multimodal Composition

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop A: 9:00am-12:00pm Session Type: Half-Day Workshop

Presenters from the Noel Studio invite attendees to explore the aural and visual components of composition studies. In this workshop, attendees will work in small groups to discuss, collect, and create sounds and images to develop their own multimodal definitions of archiTEXTure. Attendees are encouraged to create accounts and familiarize themselves with Prezi at www.prezi.com prior to the workshop.

  • Russell Carpenter,
    Eastern Kentucky University
  • Shawn Apostel,
    Eastern Kentucky University
  • Trenia Napier,
    Eastern Kentucky University
  • Leslie Valley,
    Eastern Kentucky University
Tags: Collaboration, Multiliteracies, Multimodal Composition

Using Postprocess Pedagogy to Support E-Portfolio Assessment

Room: Tompkins 110 Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop A: 9:00am-12:00pm Session Type: Half-Day Workshop
  • Catherine DeLazzero,
    Florida State University
Tags: Digital Assessment, Multimodal Composition, Pedagogy

Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop B: 1:00pm-4:00pm

Easy EPUB Ebooks with InDesign

Room: Tompkins 109 Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop B: 1:00pm-4:00pm Session Type: Half-Day Workshop
  • David Blakesley,
    Clemson University and Parlor Press
  • James Kalmbach,
    Illinois State University
  • Charles Lowe,
    Grand Valley State University
Tags: Multimodal Composition

Processing the Ways We Research, Teach, and Write (with) Digital Information

Room: Tompkins 112 Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop B: 1:00pm-4:00pm Session Type: Half-Day Workshop
  • Dawn Shepherd,
    Boise State University
  • Kevin Brock,
    North Carolina State University
  • Amber Davisson,
    Willamette University
  • Fernanda Duarte,
    North Carolina State University
  • Annette Vee,
    University of Pittsburgh
Tags: Code Studies, Digital Scholarship, Social Media

Screencap Your Feedback: Using Screen Capture Technology to Provide Audio-Visual Feedback to Writers

Room: Tompkins 126 Session Time: Thursday Half-Day Workshop B: 1:00pm-4:00pm Session Type: Half-Day Workshop
  • Chris Anson,
    North Carolina State University
  • Deanna Dannels,
    North Carolina State University
  • Meagan Kittle Autry,
    North Carolina State University
  • Dana Gierdowski,
    North Carolina State University
Tags: Digital Assessment, First-Year Writing Courses, Multimodal Composition